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Study Supports Diet High in Total Antioxidants for Lower MI Risk

Last Updated: September 27, 2012.

 

Women with highest dietary total antioxidant capacity had lower risk of MI over 10 years

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A diet high in total antioxidant capacity, based on fruits, vegetables, coffee, and whole grains, is associated with a lower risk of myocardial infarction, according to a study published in the October issue of The American Journal of Medicine.

THURSDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- A diet high in total antioxidant capacity, based on fruits, vegetables, coffee, and whole grains, is associated with a lower risk of myocardial infarction, according to a study published in the October issue of The American Journal of Medicine.

Susanne Rautiainen, from the Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, and colleagues analyzed data from 32,561 women (49 to 83 years of age) participating in the population-based prospective Swedish Mammography Cohort who were free of cardiovascular disease at baseline. Dietary total antioxidant capacity was calculated using oxygen radical absorbance capacity values based on a food-frequency questionnaire.

The researchers found that over 10 years of follow-up there were 1,114 incident cases of myocardial infarction (321,434 person-years). For women in the highest quintile of dietary total antioxidant capacity the hazard ratio for myocardial infarction was 0.80 (95 percent confidence interval, 0.67 to 0.97) compared to women in the lowest quintile. There was a nonsignificant inverse association between servings of fruit and vegetables and whole grains and myocardial infarction.

"These data suggest that dietary total antioxidant capacity, based on fruits, vegetables, coffee, and whole grains, is of importance in the prevention of myocardial infarction," Rautiainen and colleagues conclude.

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