Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Gynecology | Pathology | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Pregnancy Generates Sustained Maternal Anergy to Fetal Antigen

Last Updated: September 28, 2012.

 

Immune-suppressing cells rapidly re-accumulate during subsequent pregnancies in mouse study

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Pregnancy generates fetal-specific immune cells that suppress the immune response towards the fetus, which are rapidly re-accumulated in subsequent pregnancies, according to an experimental study published online Sept. 26 in Nature.

FRIDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnancy generates fetal-specific immune cells that suppress the immune response towards the fetus, which are rapidly re-accumulated in subsequent pregnancies, according to an experimental study published online Sept. 26 in Nature.

To establish the antigen specificity and cellular origin of maternal regulatory T cells that accumulate during gestation, Jared H. Rowe, Ph.D., from the University of Minnesota School of Medicine in Minneapolis, and colleagues impregnated female mice with strains of male mice expressing a surrogate fetal antigen.

The researchers found that maternal FOXP3-positive CD4 cells with fetal specificity selectively accumulated during pregnancy. The fetal-specific regulatory T cells persisted at elevated levels after delivery and remained tolerant to pre-existing fetal antigen. While induced FOXP3 expression and proliferation of pre-existing FOXP3-positive cells were the main contributors to regulatory T cell expansion during the primary pregnancy, proliferation of fetal-specific FOXP3-positive cells from the previous pregnancy was the main contributor to the rapid re-accumulation of regulatory T cells during subsequent pregnancies. In secondary versus primary pregnancies, fetal resorption became more resilient to partial maternal FOXP3-positive cell ablation.

"Together, these findings establish a model whereby pregnancy primes the selective accumulation and activation of maternal regulatory T cells with fetal specificity and extend the role of antigen-experienced regulatory T cells from primary into subsequent pregnancies," Rowe and colleagues conclude.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Male DNA Common in Women's Brains Next: Young BRCA Carriers Face Complex Life-Altering Decisions

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.