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Category: Dermatology | Monthly Briefing

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September 2012 Briefing - Dermatology

Last Updated: October 01, 2012.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Dermatology for September 2012. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Choice of Psoriasis Treatment Affects CVD Event Rates

THURSDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Compared with other anti-psoriatic therapies, systemic anti-inflammatory treatment of patients with severe psoriasis with biologic agents or methotrexate is associated with a lower combined risk of death, myocardial infarction, and stroke, according to research published online Sept. 11 in the Journal of Internal Medicine.

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Bacteriophages of P. acnes Have Limited Genetic Diversity

TUESDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Bacteriophages that infect the dominant bacteria inhabitant of the human sebaceous follicle, Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes), which contributes to the pathogenesis of acne, have limited genetic diversity and display a broad host range, according to a study published online Sept. 25 in mBio.

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Perceived Stress Linked to Asthma, Atopic Disorders

FRIDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Perceived stress correlates with an increased risk of adult-onset asthma, allergic rhinitis, and atopic dermatitis as well as asthma medication use, according to a study published online Sept. 3 in Allergy.

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Skin Cancer Incidence Up After Pancreas Transplantation

FRIDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Nonmelanoma skin cancers (NMSCs) commonly occur after pancreas transplantation (PT), particularly in those who have a history of skin cancer, according to a study published in the October issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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Central Centrifugal Cicatricial Alopecia Pathogenesis Studied

FRIDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Protease-activated receptor 2 (PAR-2), which is activated by cowhage, may play a role in central centrifugal cicatricial alopecia (CCCA), the most common cause of scarring hair loss in African-American women, according to research published online Sept. 17 in the British Journal of Dermatology.

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Sequential Oral, Topical Tacrolimus Benefits Dermatitis

THURSDAY, Sept. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Sequential therapy with oral tacrolimus and topical tacrolimus may be an effective treatment for severe atopic dermatitis (AD), according to a pilot study published in the October issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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Prognostic Factors ID'd for Q-Switched Laser Tattoo Removal

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Several prognostic factors impact effective tattoo removal by Q-switched laser, while a new picosecond 755-nm alexandrite laser is safe and effective for removing tattoo pigment, according to two studies published online Sept. 17 in the Archives of Dermatology.

Abstract - Bencini
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Abstract - Saedi
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Melanoma Transection Doesn't Affect Overall Survival

TUESDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Melanoma transection does not affect disease-free survival or mortality, according to a study published online Sept. 10 in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

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Promotion of Sun Safety Does Not Inhibit Outdoor Exercise

THURSDAY, Sept. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Parental perceptions of skin cancer threat do not negatively influence children's outdoor physical activity, according to a study published in the September issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Preventing Chronic Disease.

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Pregnancy-Associated Cancers on the Rise in Australia

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 12 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of pregnancy-associated cancers is increasing in Australia, with the increase only partially explained by increasing maternal age, according to a study published online Sept. 5 in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

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SPECT/CT Associated With Improved Survival in Melanoma

TUESDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with clinically lymph node-negative melanoma, the use of single-photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT) to aid sentinel lymph node excision (SLNE) is associated with increased detection of metastatic involvement and improved disease-free survival, compared with standard SLNE, according to a study published in the Sept. 12 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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New Classification of Fat Grafting Techniques Proposed

FRIDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- As the use of fat grafting in plastic surgery continues to evolve, a new way of classifying fat grafting techniques has been proposed that aims to match the technique to the specific clinical situation, according to research published in the September issue of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery.

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Imaging Device Quantifies Change in Port Wine Stains

FRIDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- A newly developed spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) device can be used to quantify biochemical compositional changes in port wine stain (PWS) lesions after laser therapy, according to a study published online Aug. 21 in Lasers in Surgery and Medicine.

Abstract
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Not All Docs/Nurses Want to Be Asked About Hand Hygiene

FRIDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Although most health care workers (HCWs) appreciate the role of patients in preventing health care-associated infection, a considerable proportion are uncomfortable with patients asking about their hand hygiene, according to a letter published online Sept. 3 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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