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Category: Neurology | Monthly Briefing

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September 2012 Briefing - Neurology

Last Updated: October 01, 2012.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Neurology for September 2012. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Benzodiazepine Use Linked to Increased Risk of Dementia

FRIDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- New use of benzodiazepines correlates with an increase in the risk of dementia, according to a study published online Sept. 27 in BMJ.

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Male DNA Common in Women's Brains

FRIDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Over 60 percent of women have male DNA in their brains, possibly from a prior pregnancy with a male fetus, which is associated with a lower prevalence of Alzheimer's disease, according to a study published online Sept. 26 in PLoS One.

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Much of Intellectual Disability Not Genetically Inherited

THURSDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- A considerable proportion of severe intellectual disability results from de-novo genetic variants, suggesting that only a small proportion of cases are likely to be inherited in an autosomal recessive fashion, according to a study published online Sept. 27 in The Lancet.

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In Treated MS, Early Disease Activity Predicts Poor Outcome

THURSDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- After 15 years of follow-up, patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) who display disease activity despite treatment with interferon (IFN)β-1a tend to have unfavorable long-term outcomes, according to research published online Sept. 13 in the Annals of Neurology.

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Being Deemed 'Unfit to Drive' Cuts Subsequent Road Crashes

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Medical warnings to patients who are potentially unfit to drive correlate with a reduction in the number of road crashes in which the patient is a driver, according to a study published in the Sept. 27 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Transcription Profile Distinguishes Subgroups in MS

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) can be differentiated according to their transcription profile, according to a study published in the Sept. 26 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

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Marijuana-Like Chemical Corrects Behavior in Fragile X

TUESDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- The protein lost in fragile X syndrome, the most common genetic cause of autism, is part of a complex that, when targeted by a drug that boosts a natural marijuana-like chemical in the brain, corrects some of the behavioral abnormalities in mice, according to a study published online Sept. 25 in Nature Communications.

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Sporadic Jakob-Creutzfeldt Disease Often Misdiagnosed

TUESDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with sporadic Jakob-Creutzfeldt disease (sCJD) are often misdiagnosed, with only 18 percent correctly diagnosed at their first assessment, according to a study published online Sept. 24 in the Archives of Neurology.

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Obstructive Sleep Apnea Linked to Perinatal Complications

TUESDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with perinatal complications in obese pregnant women, according to a study published online Sept. 21 in Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Interrelated Anxiety, GI, and Sensory Issues Common in ASD

TUESDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- For children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), a possibly interrelated phenomenon of co-existing anxiety, sensory over-responsivity, and gastrointestinal (GI) problems is common, according to a study published online Aug. 1 in the Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology.

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Urge to Overeat Linked to Production of Natural Narcotic

FRIDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- When presented with tasty foods, the brain produces the opioid peptide enkephalin that stimulates an unexpected reward center in the brain and leads to overeating, according to a study published online Sept. 20 in Current Biology.

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Neuroprosthesis Improves Decision-Making in Monkeys

THURSDAY, Sept. 20 (HealthDay News) -- A neuroprosthetic device can improve or restore impaired decision-making in monkeys, according to a study published in the October issue of the Journal of Neural Engineering.

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Drug Improves Social Function in Fragile X Syndrome

THURSDAY, Sept. 20 (HealthDay News) -- A γ-aminobutyric acid type B (GABAB) agonist, STX209 (Arbaclofen), can significantly improve social function in patients with fragile X syndrome, according to a study published in the Sept. 19 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

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Emotional Neglect in Childhood Ups Stroke Risk in Adults

THURSDAY, Sept. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Emotional neglect as a child may be tied to a higher risk of stroke as an adult, according to a study published online Sept. 19 in Neurology.

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Oral Dimethyl Fumarate Promising for Multiple Sclerosis

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis, treatment with oral BG-12 (dimethyl fumarate) is associated with a reduction in the annualized relapse rate comparable to that found with glatiramer acetate and significantly better than that found with placebo, according to two studies published in the Sept. 20 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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CSF Assay Moderately Accurate for Diagnosing Sporadic CJD

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- For individuals with suspected sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD), the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) 14-3-3 protein assay is a useful diagnostic test, according to research published online Sept. 19 in Neurology.

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White Matter Structural Changes ID'd in Children With T1DM

MONDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Children with type 1 diabetes have significant structural differences in the white matter of their brain compared to healthy children, which correlates with hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) values, according to a study published online Sept. 10 in Diabetes Care.

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Health Ambiguity Linked to Depression in Stroke Survivors

MONDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Health ambiguity, or uncertainty about the outcome of illness, is significantly associated with depression in survivors of first stroke, and this association is stronger for men than women, according to research published online Sept. 14 in the Archives of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation.

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Disability for 15 Percent of Patients After Minor Stroke, TIA

FRIDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Approximately 15 percent of patients exhibit some disability 90 days after a minor stroke or transient ischemic attack (TIA), and more than 50 percent of patients who have a recurrent event experience disability, according to a study published online Sept. 13 in Stroke.

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Meta-Analysis: Acupuncture Reasonable Chronic Pain Option

THURSDAY, Sept. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Acupuncture is an effective treatment for chronic pain conditions, including back and neck pain, osteoarthritis, and chronic headache, with pain relief superior to both no-acupuncture controls and sham-acupuncture groups, according to the results of a systematic review and meta-analysis published online Sept. 10 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Aubagio Approved for Multiple Sclerosis

THURSDAY, Sept. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Aubagio (teriflunomide) has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat adults with relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis (MS).

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Effect of Copy-Number Variation in Disease Elucidated

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 12 (HealthDay News) -- There is considerable variation in the phenotypes associated with recurrent copy-number variants, with multiple, large copy-number variants compounding to result in severe clinical presentation, according to a study published online Sept. 12 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Less Alzheimer's Pathology With Angiotensin Receptor Blocker Use

TUESDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- In autopsy findings, patients treated with angiotensin receptor blockers (ARBs) show less Alzheimer's disease (AD)-related pathology, according to a study published online Sept. 10 in the Archives of Neurology.

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Gestational Diabetes, Poverty Link to ADHD Strengthened

TUESDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- The previously reported association between attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and low socioeconomic position (SEP) has been confirmed in a large German cohort, according to a research letter published online Sept. 10 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Acupuncture Activates Neural Responses in Parkinson's

TUESDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with Parkinson's disease may benefit from acupuncture treatment on acupoint GB34, with improved neural response noted after acupuncture stimulation, according to a study published in the September issue of CNS Neurosciences & Therapeutics.

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Heavy Drinking Linked to Intracerebral Bleed at Young Age

MONDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Heavy alcohol intake correlates with intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) at a younger age, according to a study published in the Sept. 11 issue of Neurology.

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Study Finds Green Tea Component May Improve Memory

MONDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- A critical active ingredient in green tea promotes the growth of hippocampal neurons and improves memory in adult mice, according to an experimental study published in the August issue of Molecular Nutrition & Food Research.

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Cognitive Deficits for Chemo-Treated Breast Cancer Patients

FRIDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Breast cancer survivors who were previously treated with chemotherapy experience small cognitive deficits in the domains of verbal ability and visuospatial ability, according to a study published online Aug. 27 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Not All Docs/Nurses Want to Be Asked About Hand Hygiene

FRIDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Although most health care workers (HCWs) appreciate the role of patients in preventing health care-associated infection, a considerable proportion are uncomfortable with patients asking about their hand hygiene, according to a letter published online Sept. 3 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Neurocognitive Deficits Seen in Survivors of Pediatric Hodgkin's

FRIDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Adult long-term survivors of childhood Hodgkin's lymphoma are at risk for neurocognitive impairment, according to research published online Sept. 4 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Ginkgo Biloba Extract Does Not Cut Progression to Alzheimer's

THURSDAY, Sept. 6 (HealthDay News) -- For elderly adults with memory complaints, use of standardized ginkgo biloba extract is no better than placebo for reducing the incidence of Alzheimer's disease, according to a study published online Sept. 6 in The Lancet Neurology.

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Simple Eye Tracking Can Identify Neurological Disorders

THURSDAY, Sept. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) can be detected with high accuracy by tracking eye movements while watching television, according to a study published online Aug. 27 in the Journal of Neurology.

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Alzheimer's, ALS Death Rates Up for Football Players

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Neurodegenerative mortality is about three times higher among retired National Football League players, with Alzheimer's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis mortality even higher, compared to the general U.S. population, according to a study published online Sept. 5 in Neurology.

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Quitting Smoking Cuts Elevated Subarachnoid Hemorrhage Risk

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Cigarette smoking increases the risk of subarachnoid hemorrhage (SAH) in a dose-responsive manner, and cessation correlates with a reduction in SAH risk, according to a study published online Aug. 30 in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry.

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Combat Stress Affects Soldiers' Cognitive Function

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Combat stress has adverse effects on the mesofrontal circuit of the brain that are partially reversible, according to research published online Sept. 3 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Reciprocal Increased Risk of Parkinson's, Prostate Cancer

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with Parkinson's disease (PD) have a significantly increased risk of prostate cancer and melanoma, which extends to their third-degree relatives, and there is evidence of a reciprocal risk, according to a study published online Sept. 3 in the Archives of Neurology.

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Over Half of U.S. Adults With HTN Do Not Have It Under Control

TUESDAY, Sept. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Of U.S. adults with hypertension, more than half have uncontrolled hypertension, yet the majority report having a usual source of care and health insurance, according to a study published in the Sept. 4 early-release issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report.

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Plasma Glucose Tied to Atrophy in Hippocampus, Amygdala

TUESDAY, Sept. 4 (HealthDay News) -- For cognitively healthy individuals without type 2 diabetes, high plasma levels within the normal range are associated with atrophy in the hippocampus and amygdala, according to a study published in the Sept. 4 issue of Neurology.

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Metabolic Syndrome Affects Teens' Cognitive Performance

TUESDAY, Sept. 4 (HealthDay News) -- There is evidence for lower cognitive performance and changes in the brain's structural integrity among adolescents with metabolic syndrome (MetS), according to a study published online Sept. 3 in Pediatrics.

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Stressful Lifestyle, Type A Behavior Linked to Stroke

MONDAY, Sept. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Stressful habits and type A behavior correlate with an increased risk of stroke, according to a study published online Aug. 27 in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry.

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