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Category: Pediatrics | Monthly Briefing

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September 2012 Briefing - Pediatrics

Last Updated: October 01, 2012.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Pediatrics for September 2012. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Pain Intensity in Juvenile Arthritis Varies Widely

FRIDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- In youth with juvenile idiopathic arthritis (JIA), pain intensity varies within days, impacting patient quality of life, according to a study published online Sept. 12 in Arthritis Care & Research.

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Review Finds Little Impact of Exercise Interventions on Kids

FRIDAY, Sept. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Interventions to increase physical activity in children and adolescents have little impact, according to research published online Sept. 27 in BMJ.

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Pediatric Kidney Disease Tied to Abnormal Carotid Arteries

THURSDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Ultrasound measurements of carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) are significantly elevated among children with chronic kidney disease (CKD) compared with healthy controls, according to a study published online Sept. 13 in the Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology.

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Infant Regulatory Problems Predict Somatic Symptoms

THURSDAY, Sept. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Functional somatic symptoms (FSS) in childhood may be predicted by feeding, sleeping, or tactile reactivity problems in the first 10 months of life, according to a study published online Sept. 27 in The Journal of Pediatrics.

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Trio of Studies Look at Impact of Sugary Drinks on Weight

FRIDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- For adults, children, and teens, drinking sugar-sweetened beverages correlates with increases in body mass index (BMI) and obesity, according to three studies published online Sept. 21 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with presentation at the annual meeting of The Obesity Society, held from Sept. 20 to 24 in San Antonio, Texas.

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Physicians' Gut Feelings Should Not Be Dismissed

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Having a gut feeling about the seriousness of an illness, despite clinical assessment of non-severe illness, is associated with an increased risk of serious illness, according to a study published online Sept. 25 in BMJ.

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Effect of BMI Category on CVD Risk Quantified in Children

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- For school-aged children, cardiovascular disease risk parameters are worse for those who are overweight, and substantially worse for those who are obese, compared with their normal-weight peers, according to a review published online Sept. 25 in BMJ.

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Energy Expenditure Up With Active Video Gaming

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Compared with traditional sedentary video game playing, active video game playing (e.g., using the Xbox 360) significantly increases heart rate, oxygen uptake, and energy expenditure, according to research published online Sept. 24 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Marijuana-Like Chemical Corrects Behavior in Fragile X

TUESDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- The protein lost in fragile X syndrome, the most common genetic cause of autism, is part of a complex that, when targeted by a drug that boosts a natural marijuana-like chemical in the brain, corrects some of the behavioral abnormalities in mice, according to a study published online Sept. 25 in Nature Communications.

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BPA Alters Oogenesis and Follicle Formation in Primates

TUESDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Rhesus monkeys exposed to bisphenol A (BPA) experience alterations in early oogenesis and follicle formation, according to a study published online Sept. 24 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Stress-Weight Link in Black and White Teen Girls Studied

TUESDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Increased stress is tied to weight gain in teenage girls, particularly black girls, according to a study published online Sept. 20 in the Annals of Behavioral Medicine.

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Obstructive Sleep Apnea Linked to Perinatal Complications

TUESDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with perinatal complications in obese pregnant women, according to a study published online Sept. 21 in Obstetrics & Gynecology.

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Bacteriophages of P. acnes Have Limited Genetic Diversity

TUESDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Bacteriophages that infect the dominant bacteria inhabitant of the human sebaceous follicle, Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes), which contributes to the pathogenesis of acne, have limited genetic diversity and display a broad host range, according to a study published online Sept. 25 in mBio.

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Tasers Appear Safe to Use When Apprehending Young Offenders

TUESDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- The use of conducted electrical weapons (CEWs), more commonly known as Tasers, in the apprehension of minors does not result in any moderate or severe injuries, but mild superficial injuries are reported in 20 percent of suspects, according to research published in the September issue of Pediatric Emergency Care.

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Interrelated Anxiety, GI, and Sensory Issues Common in ASD

TUESDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- For children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), a possibly interrelated phenomenon of co-existing anxiety, sensory over-responsivity, and gastrointestinal (GI) problems is common, according to a study published online Aug. 1 in the Journal of Abnormal Child Psychology.

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Study Examines Prevalence of Local Allergic Rhinitis

TUESDAY, Sept. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Local allergic rhinitis (LAR) is prevalent among patients with rhinitis, affecting about one in four, and is often associated with childhood onset and persistent, severe conjunctivitis and/or asthma, according to a study published in the October issue of Allergy.

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Pediatricians Should Provide Support for Adoptive Families

MONDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- As more children are adopted each year, pediatricians must be knowledgeable about adoption issues and model positive language for adoptive families, according to a clinical report published online Sept. 24 in Pediatrics.

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AAP Strongly Discourages Home Trampolines

MONDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Home trampoline use is strongly discouraged by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), according to a policy statement published online Sept. 24 in Pediatrics.

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Childhood Antibiotic Exposure Linked to Development of IBD

MONDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Early exposure to antianaerobic antibiotics in childhood is associated with an increased risk of developing inflammatory bowel disease (IBD), according to research published online Sept. 24 in Pediatrics.

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Taste Perceptions Differ for Obese, Non-Obese Children

MONDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Obese children are less able than their normal-weight peers to identify taste qualities, according to a study published online Sept. 20 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

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Limited Evidence on Medication Use for Youth With Autism

MONDAY, Sept. 24 (HealthDay News) -- There is a lack of evidence supporting the use of medications in adolescents and young adults with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), according to a review published online Sept. 24 in Pediatrics.

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IV Acetaminophen Eases Post-Spinal Op Pain for Children

FRIDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- Children and adolescents given intravenously (IV)-administered acetaminophen after major spine surgery have significantly less postoperative pain, compared with those given placebo, but administration of acetaminophen does not reduce the need for opioids, according to a study published in the Sept. 15 issue of Spine.

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Fewer Older People on the Street May Lead Youth to Riskier Lives

FRIDAY, Sept. 21 (HealthDay News) -- There is a difference in the age profile of people observed on the streets in affluent and deprived neighborhoods, which is not always reflective of the actual age profile of the community and may influence life-history strategies, according to a study published in the September issue of Human Nature.

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Health Benefits Seen for Moving to Less Poor Neighborhood

THURSDAY, Sept. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Moving from a high-poverty to a lower-poverty neighborhood correlates with long-term improvements in physical and mental health and subjective well-being, according to a study published in the Sept. 21 issue of Science.

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Channel Blockers Reduce Causes of Asthma Symptoms

THURSDAY, Sept. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Epithelial expression of the calcium-activated chloride channel (CaCC) TMEM16A is increased in patients with asthma, and its inhibition negatively regulates epithelial mucin secretion and airway smooth muscle contraction, according to a study published online Sept. 17 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Drug Improves Social Function in Fragile X Syndrome

THURSDAY, Sept. 20 (HealthDay News) -- A γ-aminobutyric acid type B (GABAB) agonist, STX209 (Arbaclofen), can significantly improve social function in patients with fragile X syndrome, according to a study published in the Sept. 19 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

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Thin Placenta at Birth Ups Risk of Sudden Cardiac Death Later

THURSDAY, Sept. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Sudden cardiac death in adults is associated with placental size at birth, with a significantly increased risk of death for decreased placental thickness, according to a study published online Sept. 19 in the International Journal of Epidemiology.

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Parent-Reported Child Food Allergies Often Unsubstantiated

THURSDAY, Sept. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly one-third of parent-reported food allergies are not formally diagnosed by a physician, according to a study published online Sept. 3 in the Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology.

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Emotional Neglect in Childhood Ups Stroke Risk in Adults

THURSDAY, Sept. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Emotional neglect as a child may be tied to a higher risk of stroke as an adult, according to a study published online Sept. 19 in Neurology.

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Nonmedical School Vaccination Exemptions Increasing

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Nonmedical exemptions for school vaccination requirements have increased since 2005, particularly in states with easy exemption policies, according to a letter to the editor published in the Sept. 20 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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New Guidelines Issued for Pediatric Fever and Neutropenia

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- New evidence-based guidelines have been compiled on the management of fever and and neutropenia (FN) in children with cancer and/or who are undergoing hematopoietic stem-cell transplantation; the guidelines were published online Sept. 17 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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A 5 Percent Reduction in BMI Could Alter U.S. Obesity Course

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Obesity trends for 2030 could see considerable improvement if there was a 5 percent reduction in average body mass index for all adults by state, according to a report published online Sept. 18 by the Trust for America's Health (TFAH) and the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation (RWJF).

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Quitting Smoking Is Tough for Teens, Too

TUESDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Teenagers mostly experience the same negative effects of smoking abstinence and withdrawal as adults, according to a study published online Sept. 4 in Nicotine & Tobacco Research.

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Bisphenol A Linked to Obesity in Children and Teens

TUESDAY, Sept. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Children and adolescents in the United States with elevated levels of urinary bisphenol A (BPA), a ubiquitous breakdown product of coatings used in food and beverage containers, are about twice as likely to be obese, according to a study published in the Sept. 19 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association, a theme issue on obesity.

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Community-Based Intervention Feasible for Obese Children

MONDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- A community-based scalable weight-management program correlates with significant reductions in overweight status in children, according to a study published online Sept. 17 in Pediatrics.

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Maternal Vitamin D Linked to Infant Development

MONDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- During pregnancy, higher maternal circulating concentrations of 25-hydroxyvitamin D3 (25[OH]D3) correlates with improved mental and psychomotor development in infants, according to a study published online Sept. 17 in Pediatrics.

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White Matter Structural Changes ID'd in Children With T1DM

MONDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Children with type 1 diabetes have significant structural differences in the white matter of their brain compared to healthy children, which correlates with hemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) values, according to a study published online Sept. 10 in Diabetes Care.

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Sexting Linked to Riskier Sexual Behavior in Teens

MONDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Sending or receiving sexually explicit materials via cellphone, "sexting," is associated with higher reported rates of sexual activity in adolescents, according to a study published online Sept. 17 in Pediatrics.

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Researchers Quantify Impact of Sodium on BP in Children

MONDAY, Sept. 17 (HealthDay News) -- For children and adolescents, sodium intake is associated with systolic blood pressure (SBP) and the risk for pre-high blood pressure (pre-HBP) and HBP, according to a study published online Sept. 17 in Pediatrics.

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Exposure to Air Pollution Tied to Low Vitamin D in Newborns

FRIDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to two urban pollutants during pregnancy correlates with a decrease in the blood serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) of newborns, according to a study published online Aug. 17 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

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For Youth, Only Vigorous Activity Reduces Cardiometabolic Risk

FRIDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- In youth, vigorous physical activity (PA), but not light or moderate PA, correlates with improved measures of cardiometabolic risk, according to research published online Sept. 10 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Antipsychotic Use Up Among U.S. Medicaid-Enrolled Youth

FRIDAY, Sept. 14 (HealthDay News) -- There has been a substantial increase in antipsychotic use among Medicaid-enrolled children in recent years, with the increase partially driven by youth with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and those with multiple diagnoses, according to a study published online Sept. 4 in Health Services Research.

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Diagnosis of Congenital Heart Disease Ups Maternal Depression

THURSDAY, Sept. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Mothers who receive a prenatal diagnosis of congenital heart disease (CHD) commonly report posttraumatic stress, depression, and anxiety, according to research published online Sept. 12 in The Journal of Pediatrics.

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Preparation Process Eases MRI for Children With Sickle Cell

THURSDAY, Sept. 13 (HealthDay News) -- For young children with sickle cell disease (SCD), preparation and support procedures (PSP) can help reduce the need for sedation during magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans, according to a study published online June 19 in Pediatric Radiology.

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Promotion of Sun Safety Does Not Inhibit Outdoor Exercise

THURSDAY, Sept. 13 (HealthDay News) -- Parental perceptions of skin cancer threat do not negatively influence children's outdoor physical activity, according to a study published in the September issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Preventing Chronic Disease.

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Effect of Copy-Number Variation in Disease Elucidated

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 12 (HealthDay News) -- There is considerable variation in the phenotypes associated with recurrent copy-number variants, with multiple, large copy-number variants compounding to result in severe clinical presentation, according to a study published online Sept. 12 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Whooping Cough Vaccine Protection Short-Lived

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 12 (HealthDay News) -- After receiving the last of five required doses of pertussis vaccine, a child's protection from the disease rapidly declines, according to a study published in the Sept. 13 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Flow Cytometry Indicates Treatment Response in AML

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 12 (HealthDay News) -- For children with acute myeloid leukemia (AML), minimal residual disease (MRD) activity, as measured using flow cytometry, is a good indicator of treatment response, with morphologic analysis providing limited additional information, according to a study published online Sept. 10 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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PTSD Seen in Nearly 20 Percent of Young Children With Cancer

TUESDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly 20 percent of infants and preschoolers with cancer suffer from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), according to a study published online Aug. 22 in Psycho-Oncology.

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Gestational Diabetes, Poverty Link to ADHD Strengthened

TUESDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- The previously reported association between attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and low socioeconomic position (SEP) has been confirmed in a large German cohort, according to a research letter published online Sept. 10 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Updated Guidelines Issued for 'Strep' Diagnosis, Treatment

TUESDAY, Sept. 11 (HealthDay News) -- The Infectious Diseases Society of America recommends use of penicillin or amoxicillin as first-line treatment for culture-confirmed cases of Group A streptococcal (GAS) pharyngitis, according to updated clinical practice guidelines published online Sept. 9 in Clinical Infectious Diseases.

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Obese Teens Self-Report Eating Less Than Healthy-Weight Peers

MONDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Younger obese children report consuming more daily calories than their healthy-weight peers, while obese adolescents report consuming fewer daily calories, suggesting that excessive energy intake in early childhood may lead to onset of obesity, according to a study published online Sept. 10 in Pediatrics.

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Mother's Depression During Infancy Affects Child's Growth

MONDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal depression at nine months postpartum may negatively affect physical growth in early childhood, according to a study published online Sept. 10 in Pediatrics.

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No Long-Term Effects Seen for Letting Infants Cry Before Sleep

MONDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Infant sleep training techniques employed to reduce the short- to medium-term burden of infant sleep problems do not have lasting effects, according to a study published online Sept. 10 in Pediatrics.

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AAP Updates Flu Vaccine Recommendations for Children

Michael T. Brady, M.D., and colleagues from the AAP's Committee on Infectious Diseases, updated recommendations for routine use of trivalent seasonal influenza vaccine and antiviral medications for the prevention and management of influenza in children for the 2012 to 2013 season.

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Tight Glycemic Control of Little Value Post-Pediatric Heart Op

MONDAY, Sept. 10 (HealthDay News) -- For pediatric patients, tight glycemic control does not seem to reduce morbidity after cardiac surgery, according to a study published online Sept. 7 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with presentation at the Pediatric Critical Care Colloquium, held from Sept. 6 to 9 in Santa Monica, Calif.

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Disengaged Preschoolers at Academic Risk

FRIDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Preschoolers classified as extremely socially and academically disengaged have the lowest academic skills, compared with their peers, according to a study published online Aug. 24 in the Journal of School Psychology.

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Not All Docs/Nurses Want to Be Asked About Hand Hygiene

FRIDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Although most health care workers (HCWs) appreciate the role of patients in preventing health care-associated infection, a considerable proportion are uncomfortable with patients asking about their hand hygiene, according to a letter published online Sept. 3 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Neurocognitive Deficits Seen in Survivors of Pediatric Hodgkin's

FRIDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Adult long-term survivors of childhood Hodgkin's lymphoma are at risk for neurocognitive impairment, according to research published online Sept. 4 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Teens More Likely to Smoke if They Think Their Friends Smoke

FRIDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- Peer influence and social context impact adolescent smoking behaviors, with popular teenagers and adolescents who think their friends smoke more likely to become smokers, according to a study published online Sept. 6 in the Journal of Adolescent Health.

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Imaging Device Quantifies Change in Port Wine Stains

FRIDAY, Sept. 7 (HealthDay News) -- A newly developed spatial frequency domain imaging (SFDI) device can be used to quantify biochemical compositional changes in port wine stain (PWS) lesions after laser therapy, according to a study published online Aug. 21 in Lasers in Surgery and Medicine.

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Maternal Smoking Link to Teen Obesity Mediated by Fat Intake

THURSDAY, Sept. 6 (HealthDay News) -- The increased risk of obesity seen in adolescents who experienced prenatal exposure to maternal cigarette smoking (PEMCS) is associated with enhanced dietary intake of fat, which may be partially mediated by changes in the amygdala, according to research published online Sept. 3 in the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Nearly Half of Teens With Autism Are Victims of Bullying

THURSDAY, Sept. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly half of adolescents with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) are victims of bullying, according to research published online Sept. 3 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Simple Eye Tracking Can Identify Neurological Disorders

THURSDAY, Sept. 6 (HealthDay News) -- Neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) can be detected with high accuracy by tracking eye movements while watching television, according to a study published online Aug. 27 in the Journal of Neurology.

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Rates of Medical Exemptions for School Immunization Low

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Rates of medical exemptions from vaccinations required for entry to kindergarten are higher in states with easier criteria to obtain them, according to a study published online Aug. 29 in The Journal of Infectious Diseases.

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Child Glucocorticoid Use Linked to Reduced Adult Height

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Inhaled glucocorticoids taken for childhood asthma are associated with a reduction in adult height, according to a study published online Sept. 3 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with presentation at the annual meeting of the European Respiratory Society, held from Sept. 1 to 5 in Vienna.

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Assisted Listening Devices Benefit Children With Dyslexia

WEDNESDAY, Sept. 5 (HealthDay News) -- For children with dyslexia, the use of assistive listening devices (classroom frequency modulation [FM] systems) reduces auditory processing variability, with concomitant improvements in reading and phonological awareness, according to a study published online Sept. 4 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Metabolic Syndrome Affects Teens' Cognitive Performance

TUESDAY, Sept. 4 (HealthDay News) -- There is evidence for lower cognitive performance and changes in the brain's structural integrity among adolescents with metabolic syndrome (MetS), according to a study published online Sept. 3 in Pediatrics.

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Bottle-Feeding Linked to Increased Pyloric Stenosis Risk

TUESDAY, Sept. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Bottle-fed infants have a significantly increased risk of developing pyloric stenosis (PS) in the first few months after birth, compared with infants who are not bottle-fed, according to a study published online Sept. 3 in Pediatrics.

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Sleep Problems in Young Children Tied to Special Ed Need

TUESDAY, Sept. 4 (HealthDay News) -- A history of either sleep-disordered breathing (SDB) or behavioral sleep problems (BSPs) through the age of 5 years is associated with an increased likelihood of special educational need (SEN) at 8 years of age, according to a study published online Sept. 3 in Pediatrics.

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