Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Infections | AIDS | Pathology | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Study Probes How Some HIV Patients Resist AIDS

Last Updated: October 02, 2012.

 

AIDS model shows specific immune responses against three epitopes; linked to virus control

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Rare HIV-infected individuals who are able to control the virus, known as elite controllers, generate specific immune responses that correlate with viral control in a monkey model of AIDS, according to a study published online Sept. 30 in Nature.

TUESDAY, Oct. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Rare HIV-infected individuals who are able to control the virus, known as elite controllers, generate specific immune responses that correlate with viral control in a monkey model of AIDS, according to a study published online Sept. 30 in Nature.

Noting that most HIV-infected individuals who are able to control replication of the virus express the major histocompatibility alleles HLA-B*57 or HLA-B*27, Philip A. Mudd, Ph.D., from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, and colleagues vaccinated eight Indian rhesus monkeys expressing an animal model of HLA-B*27 with three CD8+ T-cell epitopes restricted to this allele (Vif RL8, Vif RL9, and Nef RL10).

The researchers found that the vaccinated animals were able to control the replication of the HIV-related, highly pathogenic simian immunodeficiency virus. The animals exhibited high frequencies of CD8+ T cells against all three epitopes, which correlated with viral control. The response against the Nef RL10 epitope was significantly associated with reduced acute phase viremia. Two of the animals that lost control of viral replication in the chronic phase also coincidentally lost reactivity against the three epitopes.

"Our findings indicate that narrowly targeted vaccine-induced virus-specific CD8+ T-cell responses can control replication of the AIDS virus," Mudd and colleagues conclude. "Understanding why these particular T-cell responses control viral replication when most other T-cell responses do not may enable the design of an effective approach to HIV vaccination."

One author disclosed financial ties to the biopharmaceutical company Vivus Inc.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: ESMO: Conjugate Ups Survival in Advanced Breast Cancer Next: Hip Resurfacing Shows Higher Failure Rate Than Replacement

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.