Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Family Medicine | Internal Medicine | Nephrology | Nursing | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

More Active Lifestyle Could Cut Risk of Chronic Kidney Disease

Last Updated: October 05, 2012.

 

Higher levels of physical activity for men, lower levels of sitting time for women tied to lower risk

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
More physical activity and less time sitting are associated with a reduced risk of chronic kidney disease, independent of other risk factors, according to research published in the October issue of the American Journal of Kidney Disease.

FRIDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- More physical activity and less time sitting are associated with a reduced risk of chronic kidney disease (CKD), independent of other risk factors, according to research published in the October issue of the American Journal of Kidney Disease.

To examine the association between CKD and lifestyle factors such as physical activity and sitting time, Nilesh Bharakhada, M.B.Ch.B., from the University Hospitals of Leicester National Health Service Trust in the United Kingdom, and colleagues utilized the International Physical Activity Questionnaire as part of a diabetes screening program for 6,379 patients (52 percent women) seen in 20 family practices.

The researchers found that, after controlling for physical activity, body mass index, and other potential confounding variables, lower levels of sitting time were associated with lower risk of CKD (odds ratio, 0.74 for lowest versus highest tertile). Compared with men, women who spent more time sitting trended toward a significantly higher risk of CKD. There was a lower risk of CKD associated with participating in at least the minimum recommended levels of physical activity, with men exhibiting a lower risk of CKD with high levels of physical activity compared to women.

"If our findings are replicated in other studies, they could be important considerations in the design of lifestyle recommendations, public health policy, and interventions for changing health behavior that are directed toward the prevention of CKD," the authors write.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Deployment Affects Mental Health of Relief Workers Next: Opiate Substitution Cuts Risk of HIV for Injection Drug Users

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.