Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Endocrinology | Family Medicine | Nursing | Pharmacy | Psychiatry | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Diverse Forms of Distress Have Distinct Impact in Diabetes

Last Updated: October 10, 2012.

 

Depressive symptoms affect self-care behaviors; diabetes-related distress impacts glycemic control

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
In primary care patients with type 2 diabetes, depressive symptoms are predictive of future lifestyle-oriented self-management behaviors, while diabetes-related distress predicts glycemic control, possibly due to medication adherence, according to research published online Oct. 1 in Diabetes Care.

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 10 (HealthDay News) -- In primary care patients with type 2 diabetes, depressive symptoms (DS) are predictive of future lifestyle-oriented self-management behaviors, while diabetes-related distress (DRD) predicts glycemic control, possibly due to medication adherence, according to research published online Oct. 1 in Diabetes Care.

James E. Aikens, Ph.D., from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, conducted a longitudinal, six-month study involving 253 primary care patients with type 2 diabetes to compare DS and DRD as longitudinal predictors of medication adherence, self-care behavior, and glycemic control.

Aikens found that the results were similar with cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses. In longitudinal analyses, DS alone correlated significantly with future diet behavior, physical activity and glucose testing. DRD alone was a significant predictor of future glycemic control and medication adherence.

"This study provides longitudinal support for the conceptual and empirical distinctions between DS and DRD in type 2 diabetes. DS may selectively suppress lifestyle-oriented self-management behaviors such as healthy eating, glucose testing, and exercise," Aikens concludes. "In contrast, diabetes-specific distress may impact subsequent medication adherence and glycemic control. Clinical assessment and intervention should encompass both factors."

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: American College of Surgeons, Sept. 30 - Oct. 4, 2012 Next: Study Supports Costoplasty for Rib Hump Deformity Correction

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.