Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Neurology | Psychiatry | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Hypnotizability Affected by Brain’s Functional Connectivity

Last Updated: October 11, 2012.

 

Functional connectivity, not structural variation, may explain hypnotizability

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Functional differences in brain connectivity may explain why some individuals are more or less hypnotizable, according to a study published in the October issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

THURSDAY, Oct. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Functional differences in brain connectivity may explain why some individuals are more or less hypnotizable, according to a study published in the October issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

Fumiko Hoeft, M.D., Ph.D., from the Stanford University School of Medicine in California, and colleagues conducted neuroimaging (functional magnetic resonance imaging [MRI], structural T1 MRI, and diffusion tensor imaging) on 12 adults with high and 12 adults with low hypnotizability to assess the brain basis of hypnotizability.

The researchers found that, compared with low hypnotizable individuals, high hypnotizable individuals had greater functional connectivity between the left dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and the salience network (composed of the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex, anterior insula, amygdala, and ventral striatum). Elevated functional coupling between the dorsal anterior cingulate cortex and the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex was confirmed by seed-based analysis in high compared with low hypnotizable individuals. Variations in brain structure in these regions, including regional gray and white matter volumes and white matter microstructure, did not explain these functional differences.

"Our results provide novel evidence that altered functional connectivity in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex and dorsal anterior cingulate cortex may underlie hypnotizability," the authors write. "Future studies focusing on how these functional networks change and interact during hypnosis are warranted."

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: CMS Nonpayment Policy Has Not Reduced Infections Next: Exercise Intensity Affects Risk of Metabolic Syndrome

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.