S. aureus endovascular infection cases have worse outcomes than coagulase-negative staphylococci” />

Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Cardiology | Infections | Internal Medicine | Nursing | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Cardiovascular IED Infections Have Distinct Features, Outcomes

Last Updated: October 12, 2012.

 

S. aureus endovascular infection cases have worse outcomes than coagulase-negative staphylococci

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Cardiovascular implantable electronic device infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci have distinct clinical features and outcomes, according to research published in the Oct. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

FRIDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Cardiovascular implantable electronic device (CIED) infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) have distinct clinical features and outcomes, according to research published in the Oct. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

Katherine Y. Le, M.D., M.P.H., from the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., and colleagues retrospectively reviewed all cases of CIED infection seen at the Mayo Clinic from 1991 through 2008 to assess device and host factors, clinical features, and patient outcomes.

Of the 280 cases of staphylococcal CIED infections, the researchers found that 43.9 percent were due to S. aureus and 56.0 percent were attributable to CoNS. Initially implanted devices were more frequently affected by S. aureus CIED infection. Corticosteroid therapy, hemodialysis, implanted catheters, prosthetic valves, and remote sources of bacteremia were associated with late S. aureus CIED infection cases as opposed to late CoNS cases. Compared with CoNS endovascular infections, cases of S. aureus endovascular infections had significantly longer duration of bacteremia (56.0 versus 20.3 percent ≥3 days), longer hospitalization (37.4 versus 15.2 percent >20 days), and increased mortality (25.2 versus 9.5 percent). A history of multiple device revisions and a higher number of total and abandoned leads at presentation were significantly associated with CoNS CIED infections versus S. aureus.

"In conclusion, CIED infections due to S. aureus and CoNS have distinct clinical features and outcomes," the authors write.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Leflunomide Considered Safe, Effective for Psoriatic Arthritis Next: Methotrexate Use Linked to Reduced Mortality in RA

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.