Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Endocrinology | Family Medicine | Internal Medicine | Nursing | Pulmonology | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Direct Link ID’d for Sleep Deprivation, Insulin Sensitivity

Last Updated: October 16, 2012.

 

Short-term sleep deprivation reduces insulin sensitivity in adipocytes and peripheral tissue

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Even short-term sleep restriction results in an insulin-resistant state in adipocytes, according to research published in the Oct. 16 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

TUESDAY, Oct. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Even short-term sleep restriction results in an insulin-resistant state in adipocytes, according to research published in the Oct. 16 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Josiane L. Broussard, Ph.D., of the University of Chicago, and colleagues conducted a randomized, two-period crossover study involving seven healthy adults, aged 18 to 30 years, to evaluate whether sleep restriction (4.5 hours sleep per night) causes reduced insulin sensitivity in subcutaneous fat. The intervention comprised four days of 4.5 hours and four days of 8.5 hours in bed, with calorie intake and physical activity controlled. Adipocytes were collected from subcutaneous fat biopsy samples and were exposed to incremental insulin concentrations after both sleep conditions. The ability of insulin to increase levels of phosphorylated Akt (pAkt) was assessed, and cellular insulin sensitivity was measured based on the insulin concentration for the half-maximal pAkt-Akt ratio.

The researchers found that, during sleep restriction, the insulin concentration for the half-maximal Akt-pAkt was nearly three times higher, and the total area under the receiver operating curve of the pAkt-Akt response was reduced by 30 percent. The impaired cellular insulin sensitivity was paralleled by a reduction in total body insulin sensitivity.

"In conclusion, our finding of a robust alteration in intracellular insulin signaling in a peripheral tissue that is pivotal in regulating energy balance and metabolism identifies a molecular mechanism underlying the adverse effect of sleep disturbances on insulin sensitivity," the authors write.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Case Series Suggest 'Mother's Kiss' Is Safe, Effective Next: ASA: Gene Variants Impact Pain After Traffic Accidents

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.