Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Family Medicine | Geriatrics | Internal Medicine | Nursing | Oncology | Pharmacy | Urology | Conference News

Back to Journal Articles

AACR: Multivitamins Linked to Modest Drop in Cancer in Men

Last Updated: October 17, 2012.

 

Nonsignificant trend for site-specific cancer reduction seen with daily multivitamin use by older men

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Over more than a decade of follow-up, daily use of a common multivitamin correlates with a modest reduction in the risk for total cancer occurrence among older men, according to a study presented at the American Association for Cancer Research's International Conference on Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research, held from Oct. 16 to 19 in Anaheim, Calif.

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Over more than a decade of follow-up, daily use of a common multivitamin correlates with a modest reduction in the risk for total cancer occurrence among older men, according to a study presented at the American Association for Cancer Research's International Conference on Frontiers in Cancer Prevention Research, held from Oct. 16 to 19 in Anaheim, Calif.

John Michael Gaziano, M.D., and Howard D. Sesso, Sc.D., M.P.H., from Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, examined the effects of multivitamin supplementation on the risk of cancer in the Physicians' Health Study II. The cohort included 14,641 U.S. male physicians, aged 50 years or older, who were randomly allocated to a common multivitamin (Centrum Silver daily) or placebo. Nine percent of the cohort had prevalent cancer at randomization.

Over a median follow-up of 11.2 years, the researchers identified 2,643 cases of cancer, including 207 cases of colorectal cancer and 1,365 cases of prostate cancer. Multivitamin use correlated with an 8 percent reduction in total cancer occurrence. There was no direct effect of multivitamin use on prostate cancer occurrence, but about a 12 percent reduction in occurrence of other site-specific cancers was observed. There was also a nonsignificant 12 percent decrease in cancer mortality associated with multivitamin use.

"There are reasons to take a multivitamin even in our adult population, who are seemingly well nourished, as a way to get recommended daily amounts of vitamins and minerals," Gaziano said in a statement. "This study suggests, at least for men, that there might be benefits to taking multivitamins in terms of cancer as well."

Press Release
More Information

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: AACR: Flavonoids Inversely Tied to Aggressive Prostate Cancer Next: Peripheral Stem Cells, Bone Marrow Yield Similar Survival

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.