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Peripheral Stem Cells, Bone Marrow Yield Similar Survival

Last Updated: October 17, 2012.

 

Findings in patients with hematological cancers participating in a multicenter trial

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Among patients with hematological cancer, there are no significant differences in survival for recipients of peripheral-blood stem-cells or bone marrow transplantation from unrelated donors, according to a study published in the Oct. 18 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Among patients with hematological cancer, there are no significant differences in survival for recipients of peripheral-blood stem-cells or bone marrow transplantation from unrelated donors, according to a study published in the Oct. 18 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Claudio Anasetti, M.D., from the H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center and Research Institute in Tampa, Fla., and colleagues from the Blood and Marrow Transplant Clinical Trials Network conducted a phase 3, multicenter trial. Five hundred fifty-one patients from 48 centers who were due to undergo transplantation for hematological cancer were randomized in a 1:1 ratio to receive either peripheral-blood stem-cell or bone marrow transplantation from unrelated donors. The patients were then stratified according to transplantation center and disease risk.

The researchers observed no significant difference in the overall survival rate at two years (51 percent in the peripheral-blood group versus 46 percent in the bone marrow group; P = 0.29). In the peripheral-blood group, the overall incidence of graft failure was 3 percent, which was significantly lower than the 9 percent in the bone marrow group (P = 0.002). In the peripheral-blood group, the incidence of chronic graft-versus-host disease (GVHD) at two years was significantly higher, at 53 percent compared with 41 percent in the bone marrow group (P = 0.01). For the incidence of acute GVHD or relapse there were no significant differences between the groups.

"We did not detect significant survival differences between peripheral-blood stem-cell and bone marrow transplantation from unrelated donors," the authors write.

Several authors disclosed financial ties to the biopharmaceutical industry.

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Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


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