Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Family Medicine | Neurology | Nursing | Oncology | Pediatrics | Psychiatry | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Social Outcomes Good for Most Pediatric Brain Tumor Survivors

Last Updated: October 19, 2012.

 

Majority exhibit positive social adjustment over long term; risk factors ID'd for lasting issues

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
While the majority of survivors of pediatric embryonal tumors display positive social outcomes several years after diagnosis and treatment, specific risk factors may affect social adjustment and behavior over the long term, according to research published online Oct. 15 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

FRIDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- While the majority of survivors of pediatric embryonal tumors display positive social outcomes several years after diagnosis and treatment, specific risk factors may affect social adjustment and behavior over the long term, according to research published online Oct. 15 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

Tara M. Brinkman, Ph.D., of the St. Jude Children's Research Hospital in Memphis, Tenn., and colleagues conducted a five-year, prospective, longitudinal study involving 220 survivors of pediatric embryonal tumors to evaluate social outcomes for these children.

The researchers found that, on measures of social functioning, few children were reported to have clinically elevated scores. Although the mean scores differed significantly from population norms, they were within the average range. Compared with patients with average-risk treatment status, children with high-risk treatment status were significantly more likely to have increased social problems and display withdrawn/depressed behavior. Over time, there were greater parent-reported social problems for those with posterior fossa syndrome. Compared with male patients, females exhibited higher withdrawn/depressed scores over time. Parent report of social functioning also correlated with patient intelligence, age at diagnosis, and parent education level.

"Results of this study largely suggest positive social adjustment several years after diagnosis and treatment of a pediatric embryonal tumor," the authors write. "However, several factors, including treatment risk status and posterior fossa syndrome, may be important precursors of long-term social outcomes. Future research is needed to elucidate the trajectory of social functioning as these patients transition into adulthood."

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Procedure Can Treat Stiff-Knee Gait in Spastic Cerebral Palsy Next: Intracranial Tumors Can Be Resected Safely in Elderly

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.