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Report Describes Current State of Interventional Cardiology

Last Updated: October 19, 2012.

 

Data on over two million procedures illustrate patient characteristics and presentation, current practice

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An analysis of cardiac catheterization laboratories in the United States, providing a current snapshot of patient characteristics and presentation as well as current practice, has been published online Oct. 17 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

FRIDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- An analysis of cardiac catheterization laboratories in the United States, providing a current snapshot of patient characteristics and presentation as well as current practice, has been published online Oct. 17 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Gregory J. Dehmer, M.D., from the Texas A&M Health Science Center College of Medicine in Temple, and colleagues analyzed data on 1,110,150 patients undergoing diagnostic cardiac catheterization only and 941,248 undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), from 2010 to 2011. Patient information was taken from the CathPCI Registry of the National Cardiovascular Data Registry, which collects data from approximately 85 percent of the cardiac catheterization laboratories in the United States.

The researchers found that almost 80 percent of patients undergoing PCI were overweight, 80 percent had dyslipidemia, 82 percent had high blood pressure, and 27.6 percent were current or recent smokers. Femoral artery access was used in over 90 percent of procedures. Among PCI patients, 70 percent presented with a heart attack, about 18 percent had stable angina, and 12 percent had no angina or atypical symptoms. For patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction, the median door-to-balloon time was 64.5 minutes for non-transfer patients and 121 minutes for transfer patients.

"Data from the CathPCI Registry provide a contemporary view of the current practice of invasive cardiology in the United States," Dehmer and colleagues write.

Several authors disclosed financial relationships with drug and medical device companies.

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Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


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