Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Gynecology | Oncology | Radiology | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

New Scan Feasible for 3D Diagnosis of Breast Cancer

Last Updated: October 23, 2012.

 

Method reduces radiation dose, acquisition time, while maintaining high image resolution, contrast

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
A high-resolution, low-dose phase contrast X-ray tomographic method of three-dimensional diagnosis, using an image reconstruction method known as equally sloped tomography, can be used to identify malignant breast cancer at clinically compatible doses of radiation, according to research published online Oct. 22 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

TUESDAY, Oct. 23 (HealthDay News) -- A high-resolution, low-dose phase contrast X-ray tomographic method of three-dimensional (3D) diagnosis, using an image reconstruction method known as equally sloped tomography, can be used to identify malignant breast cancer at clinically compatible doses of radiation, according to research published online Oct. 22 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Noting that about 10 to 20 percent of palpable tumors are not detectable on mammograms and that only about 40 percent of biopsied lesions are malignant, Yunzhe Zhao, Ph.D., from the University of California in Los Angeles, and colleagues describe a novel technique for identifying human breast cancers which combines phase contrast X-ray imaging with an image reconstruction method.

The researchers found that using the equally sloped tomography approach, a human breast was imaged in three dimensions, and a malignant cancer with a pixel size of 92 µm was identified at a radiation dose lower than that of dual-view mammography. Compared with conventional phase contrast X-ray tomography, the method can reduce the radiation dose and acquisition time by approximately 74 percent, according to a blind evaluation by five independent radiologists, and the technique maintained high image resolution and image contrast.

"These results demonstrate that high-resolution 3D diagnostic imaging of human breast cancers can, in principle, be performed at clinical compatible doses," the authors write.

The research was funded in part by a UC Discovery/TomoSoft Technologies grant.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: ACG: Electrical Stimulation of Esophageal Sphincter Aids GERD Next: Signaling in Prostate Tumors Indicates Responsiveness

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.