Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Cardiology | Family Medicine | Geriatrics | Internal Medicine | Emergency Medicine | Neurology | Nursing | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Study Confirms Stroke Survivors Continuing to Smoke Fare Worse

Last Updated: October 25, 2012.

 

Risk of death or recurrent vascular events smaller in ex-smokers

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Stroke patients who are current or ex-smokers are at greater risk of death or another stroke or heart attack than stroke patients who never smoked, though the risk in ex-smokers is smaller, according to a study published online Oct. 25 in Stroke.

THURSDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Stroke patients who are current or ex-smokers are at greater risk of death or another stroke or heart attack than stroke patients who never smoked, though the risk in ex-smokers is smaller, according to a study published online Oct. 25 in Stroke.

Joosup Kim, from the Monash Medical Center in Clayton, Australia, and colleagues examined the association between smoking and the risk of death or further vascular events (recurrent stroke and myocardial infarction) in 1,589 patients with stroke recruited from 1996 to 1999 in a defined geographical region.

Over a ten-year period, the researchers found that, compared with never smokers, current smokers at the time of stroke had a significantly higher risk of poorer outcomes (hazard ratio [HR], 1.30). Among patients who survived for at least 28 days, compared with never smokers, poorer outcomes were also significantly more likely among current smokers (HR, 1.42) and ex-smokers (HR, 1.18). The risk of recurrent events was also elevated for current smokers versus past smokers (HR, 1.23).

"Patients who smoked at the time of their stroke or had smoked before their stroke had greater risk of death or recurrent vascular events when compared with patients who were never smokers," Kim and colleagues conclude. "People with stroke who are younger, or male, or living in more disadvantaged areas are likely to be smokers and these groups should be targeted for smoking cessation for primary prevention of stroke."

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Laser + Bipolar Resection Helpful for Large Prostates Next: Surgery Center Influences Outcomes in Spinal Surgery

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.