Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Family Medicine | Gynecology | Nursing | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Incidence of Recurrent Anal Sphincter Rupture ~7 Percent

Last Updated: October 26, 2012.

 

Risk factors include birth weight, vacuum extraction, delivery interval, prior fourth-degree ASR

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
The incidence of recurrent anal sphincter rupture is 7.1 percent, and several risk factors are associated with an increased risk, including excessive birth weight, vacuum extraction, and shoulder dystocia, according to research published online Oct. 19 in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

FRIDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- The incidence of recurrent anal sphincter rupture (ASR) is 7.1 percent, and several risk factors are associated with an increased risk, including excessive birth weight, vacuum extraction, and shoulder dystocia, according to research published online Oct. 19 in BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology.

Hanna Jangö, from Herlev University Hospital in Copenhagen, Denmark, and colleagues used data from the National Medical Birth Registry in Denmark to identify patients with a first and a second vaginal delivery from 1997 to 2010 and assessed the risk factors for recurrent ASR.

The researchers found that 4.6 percent of the 159,446 women experienced an ASR at first delivery and 7.1 percent had a recurrent ASR (odds ratio [OR], 5.91). The risk of recurrent ASR increased significantly with birth weight (adjusted OR, 2.94 per increasing kg); vacuum extraction (aOR, 2.96); shoulder dystocia (aOR, 1.98); delivery interval (aOR, 1.08 by year); year of second delivery (aOR, 1.06); and prior fourth-degree ASR (aOR, 1.72). Head circumference correlated with significantly reduced likelihood of ASR (aOR, 0.91 per increasing cm).

"The incidence of recurrent ASR in our study population was 7.1 percent," the authors write. "Half of the patients with a recurrent ASR have risk factors, but most factors are first known at the very end of delivery. We need studies to quantify the adverse effects of vaginal delivery after ASR in order to improve counseling and decision-making on the subsequent mode of delivery."

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: High Reliability for Hypersexual Disorder Diagnostic Criteria Next: Impact of Partial Sleep Deprivation on Weight Explored

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.