Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Cardiology | Family Medicine | Geriatrics | Internal Medicine | Emergency Medicine | Nursing | Pulmonology | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Smoke-Free Laws Linked to Fewer Hospital Admissions

Last Updated: October 29, 2012.

 

Findings for coronary, respiratory admissions; comprehensive laws linked to larger changes

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Comprehensive smoke-free legislation is associated with decreases in hospital admissions for cardiovascular and respiratory disease, according to a meta-analysis published in the Oct. 30 issue of Circulation.

MONDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Comprehensive smoke-free legislation is associated with decreases in hospital admissions for cardiovascular and respiratory disease, according to a meta-analysis published in the Oct. 30 issue of Circulation.

Crystal E. Tan and Stanton A. Glantz, Ph.D., from the University of California in San Francisco, conducted a random effects meta-analysis of 45 studies involving 33 smoke-free laws, with a median follow-up of 24 months, to assess the correlation between smoke-free legislation and hospital admission or death from cardiac, cerebrovascular, and respiratory diseases.

The researchers found that comprehensive smoke-free legislation correlated with significantly lower rates of hospital admissions (or deaths) for coronary events (relative risk [RR], 0.848), other heart disease (RR, 0.610), cerebrovascular accidents (RR, 0.840), and respiratory disease (RR, 0.760). Longer follow-up was not associated with a change in the difference in risk following comprehensive smoke-free laws. Larger changes in risk correlated with more comprehensive laws.

"This study provides evidence that smoke-free laws are followed by fewer hospitalizations and lower health care expenditures for a wide range of diseases and that comprehensive laws ending smoking in workplaces, restaurants, and bars are associated with greater effects," the authors write. "The general public, public health professionals, and policy makers should consider these positive associations as they develop smoke-free legislation and decide whether or not to include exceptions to these laws."

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Potential Biomarker, Drug Target ID'd for Adult Leukemia Next: Children With Migraine at Risk for Poor School Performance

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.