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Resveratrol Has No Metabolic Benefit for Non-Obese Women

Last Updated: October 30, 2012.

 

Does not affect its putative targets in fat or muscle in women with normal glucose tolerance

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Resveratrol supplementation does not improve plasma lipids or insulin sensitivity in non-obese women, nor does it affect its putative targets in fat or muscle, according to a study published online Oct. 25 in Cell Metabolism.

TUESDAY, Oct. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Resveratrol supplementation does not improve plasma lipids or insulin sensitivity in non-obese women, nor does it affect its putative targets in fat or muscle, according to a study published online Oct. 25 in Cell Metabolism.

Jun Yoshino, M.D., Ph.D., from Washington University in St. Louis, and colleagues conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial in which 45 non-obese, postmenopausal women with normal glucose tolerance were allocated to receive 12 weeks of resveratrol supplementation (75 mg/day), 12 weeks of placebo, or calorie restriction to achieve a 5 percent weight loss within 12 weeks (15 women each). The metabolic effects were evaluated using a two-stage hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp procedure performed in conjunction with stable isotopically labeled tracer infusions.

The researchers found that resveratrol supplementation correlated with increased plasma resveratrol concentration, but it did not alter body composition, resting metabolic rate, plasma lipids, or inflammatory markers. Resveratrol did not increase liver, skeletal muscle, or adipose tissue insulin sensitivity based on results from the clamp procedure. In skeletal muscle and adipose tissue, resveratrol had no effect on its postulated molecular targets, including AMPK, SIRT1, NAMPT, and PPARGC1A.

"These findings demonstrate that resveratrol supplementation does not have beneficial metabolic effects in non-obese, postmenopausal women with normal glucose tolerance," the authors write.

Two authors disclosed financial ties to Sirtris Pharmaceuticals and DSM Nutritional Products.

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Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


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