Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Cardiology | Monthly Briefing

Back to Journal Articles

October 2012 Briefing - Cardiology

Last Updated: November 01, 2012.

 

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 

Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Cardiology for October 2012. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Greater Drop in LDL Seen With Atorvastatin + PCSK9 Antibody

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Addition of the fully human serum proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin 9 monoclonal antibody, SAR236553, to atorvastatin is associated with greater reductions in low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol levels compared with atorvastatin alone, according to a study published online Oct. 31 in the New England Journal of Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text

Smoke-Free Workplace Laws Lead to Decline in MI Incidence

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Following implementation of workplace smoke-free laws, the incidence of myocardial infarction (MI) decreased significantly in Olmsted County, Minn., according to a study published online Oct. 29 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Only Omega-3s From Fish Tied to Lower Cerebrovascular Risk

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Intake of omega-3 fatty acids from fish, but not circulating biomarkers or supplements, correlates with modestly reduced cerebrovascular risk, according to a meta-analysis published online Oct. 30 in BMJ.

Full Text
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Total Bilirubin Predicts In-Hospital Mortality in STEMI

TUESDAY, Oct. 30 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI) undergoing primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), serum total bilirubin (TB) levels can be used to predict the risk of in-hospital mortality, according to a study published online Oct. 26 in The American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

U.S. Medicare Spending on Elderly Has Outpaced Canada's

TUESDAY, Oct. 30 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. Medicare spending on the elderly has grown nearly three times faster than its Canadian counterpart, according to a study published online Oct. 29 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Smoke-Free Laws Linked to Fewer Hospital Admissions

MONDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Comprehensive smoke-free legislation is associated with decreases in hospital admissions for cardiovascular and respiratory disease, according to a meta-analysis published in the Oct. 30 issue of Circulation.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Independent Link for Child BMI, Adult Cardio Risk Questioned

FRIDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Although the evidence for an association between childhood body mass index (BMI) and cardiovascular outcomes seems consistent, few studies examine this association independent of adult BMI, according to research published in the November issue of Obesity Reviews.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Sleep Apnea Linked to Less Severe Injury During Acute MI

THURSDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- During an acute non-fatal myocardial infarction (MI), patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) have less severe cardiac injury, according to a study published in the October issue of Sleep and Breathing.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Study Confirms Stroke Survivors Continuing to Smoke Fare Worse

THURSDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Stroke patients who are current or ex-smokers are at greater risk of death or another stroke or heart attack than stroke patients who never smoked, though the risk in ex-smokers is smaller, according to a study published online Oct. 25 in Stroke.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Bystander CPR More Likely in High-Income White Neighborhoods

THURSDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Bystanders are more likely to initiate cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) on patients who have a cardiac arrest in high-income white neighborhoods, according to a study published in the Oct. 25 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

A-Fib Burden Similar With Ablation, Antiarrhythmic Meds

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 24 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation with no history of antiarrhythmic drug use, there is no significant difference in the cumulative burden of atrial fibrillation over two years between the treatment strategies of radiofrequency catheter ablation or antiarrhythmic agents, according to a study published in the Oct. 25 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Better Obesity Risk Prediction With Hip and Waist Measures

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Inclusion of both waist and hip circumference as separate anthropometric measurements may improve risk prediction for obesity-related mortality and morbidity, according to research published online Oct. 17 in Obesity Reviews.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Four Factors Account for Most of Risk Linked to PAD in Men

TUESDAY, Oct. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Smoking, hypertension, high cholesterol, and type 2 diabetes account for most of the risk for developing peripheral artery disease (PAD) among men, according to a study published in the Oct. 24 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Genuine Very Large Effects in Trials Rare in Medicine

TUESDAY, Oct. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Large treatment effects are most likely to be found in small studies, with the effect diminishing with additional trials, according to research published in the Oct. 24 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Antihypertensive Medication Use, BP Control Up in U.S.

TUESDAY, Oct. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Antihypertensive medication use and blood pressure control are increasing among U.S. adults, but racial disparities still exist, according to a study published in the Oct. 23 issue of Circulation.

Abstract
Full Text

Genetic Predisposition to Diabetes Ups Risk of CVD

TUESDAY, Oct. 23 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with type 2 diabetes (T2D), having a genetic predisposition towards the disease is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD), according to a study published online Oct. 15 in Diabetes Care.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Metabolic Factors Impact Risk of Death From Prostate Cancer

MONDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Metabolic factors are not associated with the risk of prostate cancer, but high levels are associated with increased risk of death from prostate cancer, according to research published online Oct. 22 in Cancer.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Effects of Bariatric Surgery on Heart Function, Structure ID'd

MONDAY, Oct. 22 (HealthDay News) -- Bariatric surgery is associated with improvement or resolution of preexisting hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and diabetes in a majority of participants, as well as with improvements in left ventricular hypertrophy and diastolic function, according to research published online Oct. 17 in Heart.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Anergia Prevalent in Acute Coronary Syndrome Patients

FRIDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Anergia, or the lack of energy, is highly prevalent in patients with acute coronary syndromes (ACS), and correlates independently with several factors, including bodily pain and exercise participation, according to a study published in the Nov. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Report Describes Current State of Interventional Cardiology

FRIDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- An analysis of cardiac catheterization laboratories in the United States, providing a current snapshot of patient characteristics and presentation as well as current practice, has been published online Oct. 17 in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology.

Full Text

Sedentary Time Linked to Increased Diabetes Risk

FRIDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Greater sedentary time is associated with increased risk of diabetes, cardiovascular disease, and cardiovascular and all-cause mortality, with the most consistent associations seen for diabetes, according to a review and meta-analysis published in the November issue of Diabetologia.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Morphology of Bicuspid Aortic Valve Influences Outcomes

THURSDAY, Oct. 18 (HealthDay News) -- The morphology of bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) malformations plays an important role in outcomes, according to a study published in the Nov. 1 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Exercise Stimulates Adiponectin, Raises HDL Levels

THURSDAY, Oct. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Intensive lifestyle intervention for weight loss (ILI) significantly improves high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C) levels in overweight and obese individuals with type 2 diabetes, which is partially mediated by stimulation of adiponectin production, according to a study published online Sept. 5 in the Journal of Lipid Research.

Abstract
Full Text

Treating Obstructive Sleep Apnea Tied to Lasting BP Drop

THURSDAY, Oct. 18 (HealthDay News) -- In men with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) and preexisting systemic hypertension or type 2 diabetes, positive airway pressure (PAP) is associated with a significant and sustained reduction in both systolic and diastolic blood pressure (BP), according to research published in the Oct. 15 issue of the Journal of Clinical Sleep Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Return to Work Difficult for Doctors on Sick Leave

THURSDAY, Oct. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Returning to work after a prolonged sick leave for physical or mental health problems, or drug or alcohol problems, is difficult for doctors, who describe self-stigmatization and fear a negative response on their return to work, according to a study published online Oct. 15 in BMJ Open.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Surgery Linked to Cardiac Death in Cancer Patients

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Cancer patients who undergo surgery are more than twice as likely to die from a cardiovascular cause within a month of surgery, according to a research letter published in the Oct. 18 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Lipid Profiles Improved in Past Two Decades in United States

TUESDAY, Oct. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Since 1988, levels of cholesterol and related lipids have been moving in a favorable direction among adults in the United States, even among the obese and those not taking lipid-lowering drugs, according to a study published in the Oct. 17 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Recent Drop in Post-Discharge Mortality After Acute MI

TUESDAY, Oct. 16 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI), post-discharge mortality rates decreased from 2001 to 2007, according to a study published in the Oct. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Device Data Can ID Heart Failure Patients at Readmission Risk

MONDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- The use of device diagnostics to risk stratify patients during the first seven days after discharge can help identify patients at greatest risk of readmission for heart failure, according to research published online Oct. 4 in The American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Cardiovascular IED Infections Have Distinct Features, Outcomes

FRIDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Cardiovascular implantable electronic device (CIED) infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) have distinct clinical features and outcomes, according to research published in the Oct. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

PCI Linked to Increased Platelet Reactivity

FRIDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with coronary artery disease who receive percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) have increased platelet reactivity after the procedure despite antiplatelet therapy, according to a study published online Oct. 5 in the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Hormone Replacement Therapy Initiated Early Deemed Safe

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 10 (HealthDay News) -- For women who receive hormone replacement therapy soon after menopause, long-term cardiovascular outcomes are good, with no increase in the risk of any cancer, according to a study published online Oct. 9 in BMJ.

Full Text

PCI Used Less in States With Public Reporting of Outcomes

TUESDAY, Oct. 9 (HealthDay News) -- The use of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) is significantly lower in states with public reporting of outcomes compared to states without public reporting, although there are no differences in overall mortality, according to a study published in the Oct. 10 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

New Imaging Technique Could Better ID Early Coronary Disease

TUESDAY, Oct. 9 (HealthDay News) -- A new magnetic resonance imaging-based technique can better identify increases in coronary vessel wall thickness in people at risk for coronary artery disease, according to a study published online Oct. 9 in Radiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Low-Dose Aspirin Use Shows Neuroprotective Effect in Women

TUESDAY, Oct. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Daily low-dose aspirin treatment may reduce global cognitive decline in older women at high risk for cardiovascular disease, according to a study published online Oct. 3 in BMJ Open.

Abstract
Full Text

Unsuspected PE Seldom Linked to Death in Cancer Patients

TUESDAY, Oct. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Unsuspected pulmonary embolism (UPE) is not associated with an increased risk of death in cancer patients when compared to patients without pulmonary embolism (PE), according to research published in the October issue of the Journal of Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Serum Lycopene Inversely Linked to Risk of Stroke in Men

MONDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- High serum concentrations of lycopene correlate with a significantly reduced risk of stroke in men, according to a study published in the Oct. 9 issue of Neurology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Larger Study Confirms Statins' Role in Preventing Cardiac Events

FRIDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- A large and unselected community-based study has confirmed the results of randomized controlled trials that have found persistent statin use to be beneficial for the primary prevention of acute cardiac events; the study was published online Sept. 27 in The American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Positive Predictive Value of Treadmill Test Varies in Women

THURSDAY, Oct. 4 (HealthDay News) -- The positive predictive value (PPV) of the exercise treadmill test (ETT) for coronary artery disease (CAD) in women is altered significantly by age and certain exercise responses, according to a study published online Sept. 26 in The American Journal of Cardiology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Increased Weight Cuts Death Risk in Rheumatoid Arthritis

THURSDAY, Oct. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Being overweight or obese reduces the risk of all-cause mortality in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) patients, according to a study published in the October issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Lower Glaucoma Risk for Statin Users With Hyperlipidemia

THURSDAY, Oct. 4 (HealthDay News) -- For individuals with hyperlipidemia, statin use is associated with significant reductions in the risk of open-angle glaucoma (OAG), according to research published in the October issue of Ophthalmology.

Abstract
Full Text

Moderate Drinking Ups A-Fib Risk in Adults at Risk for CVD

THURSDAY, Oct. 4 (HealthDay News) -- In older people with heart disease or advanced diabetes with organ damage, moderate alcohol consumption increases the risk of atrial fibrillation, according to research published online Oct. 1 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text

Foam Cells in Atherosclerosis Suppress Inflammation

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 3 (HealthDay News) -- The formation of macrophage foam cells, which are characteristic of atherosclerotic lesions, correlates with suppression of inflammatory genes, according to a study published in the Sept. 28 issue of Cell.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

C-Reactive Protein, Fibrinogen Slightly Improve Risk Modeling

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 3 (HealthDay News) -- The addition of C-reactive protein (CRP) or fibrinogen offers a modest improvement to conventional cardiovascular risk modeling, according to a study published in the Oct. 4 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Limiting the Problem of Missing Data Urged for Clinical Trials

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Missing data compromise inferences from clinical trials, and due to the problematic nature of compensation with analysis methods, the importance of avoiding missing data in clinical trials is paramount, according to a special report published in the Oct. 4 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Severe Anemia Linked to Poorer Heart Surgery Outcomes

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Adults undergoing cardiac surgery who have moderate-to-severe preoperative anemia have significantly increased morbidity and mortality compared with non-severely anemic patients, according to research published in the October issue of the Annals of Thoracic Surgery.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Study Finds β-Blockers May Not Reduce Cardiovascular Event Risk

TUESDAY, Oct. 2 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) risk factors alone, previous myocardial infarction (MI), or CAD without MI, β-blockers are not associated with a lower rate of cardiovascular events, according to a study published in the Oct. 3 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Observation Units Could Save $3.1 Billion Nationally Per Year

TUESDAY, Oct. 2 (HealthDay News) -- The addition of observation units to U.S. hospitals which do not currently have them in place could save $3.1 billion nationally per year in health care costs, according to a study published online Sept. 26 in Health Affairs.

Abstract
Full Text

Pregnancy-Onset Snoring Linked to High Blood Pressure

TUESDAY, Oct. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Pregnancy-onset snoring is associated with a significantly increased risk of gestational hypertension and preeclampsia, according to research published online Sept. 10 in the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Patients Benefit From Access to Physician Notes

MONDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Patients report clinically relevant benefits and minimal concerns, while doctors do not experience negative consequences, from allowing patient access to visit notes, according to a study published in the Oct. 1 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial

Melatonin Effective for Sleep in Patients Taking β-Blockers

MONDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Patients taking β-blockers for hypertension, which can disturb sleep, have improved sleep quality with melatonin treatment, according to a study published in the Oct. 1 issue of SLEEP.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

New Defibrillator Implanted Just Under the Skin

MONDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- The first defibrillator that doesn't require a hard-wired connection to the heart has been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration, the agency said Friday in a news release.

National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute

Copyright © 2012 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.


Previous: October 2012 Briefing - Allergy Next: October 2012 Briefing - Dermatology

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.