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Category: Infections | Monthly Briefing

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October 2012 Briefing - Infectious Disease

Last Updated: November 01, 2012.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Infectious Disease for October 2012. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

FDA: Ameridose Issues Voluntary Recall of All Products

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Ameridose, a Massachusetts-based manufacturer of sterile injectable products and oral syringes, is undergoing a voluntary recall of all unexpired products in circulation, according to an Oct. 31 news release issued by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.

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Program to Up Access to Combo Malaria Therapy Successful

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Implementation of a series of national-scale pilot programs designed to increase the access and use of quality-assured artemisinin-based combination therapies (QAACTs) for malaria by the Affordable Medicines Facility-malaria (AMFm) has improved the availability, price, and market share of QAACTs, according to a study published online Oct. 31 in The Lancet.

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U.S. Medicare Spending on Elderly Has Outpaced Canada's

TUESDAY, Oct. 30 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. Medicare spending on the elderly has grown nearly three times faster than its Canadian counterpart, according to a study published online Oct. 29 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Differences in Sepsis Care Identified in Europe, U.S.

FRIDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Despite differences in processes of care and raw mortality for patients with severe sepsis and septic shock in the United States and Europe, after adjustment, mortality rates are similar, according to a study published online Oct. 26 in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

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Intestinal Bacteria Profile Altered in Pediatric Crohn's

THURSDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Pediatric patients with Crohn's disease have altered levels of particular fecal bacterial species, some of which correlate with disease severity, according to a study published in the October issue of the Journal of Clinical Microbiology.

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Meta-Analysis: Antivirals Reduce Risk of Liver Cancer in Hep C

THURSDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Antiviral treatment does significantly reduce the risk of developing liver cancer for patients with chronic hepatitis C infection, particularly in virological responders, according to a meta-analysis published online Oct. 22 in BMJ Open.

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Genuine Very Large Effects in Trials Rare in Medicine

TUESDAY, Oct. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Large treatment effects are most likely to be found in small studies, with the effect diminishing with additional trials, according to research published in the Oct. 24 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Return to Work Difficult for Doctors on Sick Leave

THURSDAY, Oct. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Returning to work after a prolonged sick leave for physical or mental health problems, or drug or alcohol problems, is difficult for doctors, who describe self-stigmatization and fear a negative response on their return to work, according to a study published online Oct. 15 in BMJ Open.

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Vaccination Strategy Effective Against Genital Herpes

THURSDAY, Oct. 18 (HealthDay News) -- A new vaccination strategy is effective against genital herpes and possibly other sexually transmitted infections, according to an experimental study published online Oct. 17 in Nature.

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Linezolid Beneficial in Drug-Resistant Tuberculosis

THURSDAY, Oct. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Adding linezolid to ongoing background therapy for the treatment of extensively drug-resistant (XDR) pulmonary tuberculosis is effective in achieving culture conversion, but patients must be carefully monitored for adverse events, according to research published in the Oct. 18 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Cardiovascular IED Infections Have Distinct Features, Outcomes

FRIDAY, Oct. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Cardiovascular implantable electronic device (CIED) infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and coagulase-negative staphylococci (CoNS) have distinct clinical features and outcomes, according to research published in the Oct. 15 issue of The American Journal of Cardiology.

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HIV Diagnosis in Hispanics or Latinos Varies Geographically

THURSDAY, Oct. 11 (HealthDay News) -- The distribution of new diagnoses of HIV among Hispanics or Latinos in the United States and Puerto Rico varies by region, as do characteristics of those infected, according to research published in the Oct. 12 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report.

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Prior Alcohol Consumption Does Not Impair HCV Treatment

THURSDAY, Oct. 11 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) treated with pegylated interferon-alpha and ribavirin (P/R), drinking patterns and the amount of alcohol consumed before treatment do not impact treatment success, according to a study published in the October issue of Hepatology.

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HIV Status Doesn't Influence Hodgkin's Lymphoma Outcome

THURSDAY, Oct. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Despite more extensive disease and more adverse prognostic factors, HIV-positive patients with Hodgkin's lymphoma (HL) do not have worse outcomes when treated with doxorubicin, bleomycin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine (ABVD), according to research published online Oct. 8 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Collaborative Infection Control Benefits All Regional Hospitals

THURSDAY, Oct. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Collaborative infection control efforts to reduce the prevalence of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and other organisms are likely to obtain better results than hospitals acting alone, according to research published in the October issue of Health Affairs.

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New Cervical Cancer Vaccine Targets HPV-Infected Women

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 10 (HealthDay News) -- A new candidate vaccine designed to prevent cervical dysplasia and cancer in women already infected with human papillomavirus (HPV) serotypes 16 and 18 is well tolerated and induces a robust immune response, according to a phase 1 study published in the Oct. 10 issue of Science Translational Medicine.

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CMS Nonpayment Policy Has Not Reduced Infections

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Implementation of the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) policy to reduce payment for preventable hospital-acquired conditions in October 2008 has not impacted infection rates in U.S. hospitals, according to a study published in the Oct. 11 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Bitter Taste Linked to Response to Respiratory Infections

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Bitter taste receptors are connected with the ability to detect and respond to gram-negative bacteria such as Pseudomonas aeruginosa in the upper respiratory tract, according to a study published online Oct. 8 in the Journal of Clinical Investigation.

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HIV Mortality Decreasing, but Disparities Persist

TUESDAY, Oct. 9 (HealthDay News) -- HIV death rates decreased from 1993-1995 to 2005-2007, but socioeconomic disparities are increasing, according to a study published online Oct. 8 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Opiate Substitution Cuts Risk of HIV for Injection Drug Users

FRIDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Among people who inject drugs, opiate substitution treatment correlates with more than a 50 percent reduction in the risk of HIV infection, according to research published online Oct. 4 in BMJ.

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HCV Treatment in Prison Could Be Key Public Health Measure

FRIDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Incarcerated patients with hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection are as likely to be treated and to achieve a sustained viral response (SVR) as non-incarcerated patients, according to research published in the October issue of Hepatology.

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Public Response to H1N1 Flu Varies Between Countries

FRIDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- There are considerable differences in the adoption of preventive behaviors in response to the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic between countries, although adoption of these behaviors does not impact the likelihood of getting vaccinated, according to a study published online Oct. 5 in The Lancet Infectious Diseases.

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Wide Variation in Screening for Multidrug Organisms in ICUs

FRIDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- The adoption of multidrug resistant organism (MDRO) screening and infection control interventions in intensive care units (ICUs) varies widely, according to a study published in the October issue of the American Journal of Infection Control.

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Limiting the Problem of Missing Data Urged for Clinical Trials

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Missing data compromise inferences from clinical trials, and due to the problematic nature of compensation with analysis methods, the importance of avoiding missing data in clinical trials is paramount, according to a special report published in the Oct. 4 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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High-Dose Vitamin D Does Not Prevent or Treat Colds

TUESDAY, Oct. 2 (HealthDay News) -- High monthly doses of vitamin D do not reduce the incidence or severity of upper respiratory tract infections (URTIs), according to a study published in the Oct. 3 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Study Probes How Some HIV Patients Resist AIDS

TUESDAY, Oct. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Rare HIV-infected individuals who are able to control the virus, known as elite controllers, generate specific immune responses that correlate with viral control in a monkey model of AIDS, according to a study published online Sept. 30 in Nature.

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Observation Units Could Save $3.1 Billion Nationally Per Year

TUESDAY, Oct. 2 (HealthDay News) -- The addition of observation units to U.S. hospitals which do not currently have them in place could save $3.1 billion nationally per year in health care costs, according to a study published online Sept. 26 in Health Affairs.

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Patients Benefit From Access to Physician Notes

MONDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Patients report clinically relevant benefits and minimal concerns, while doctors do not experience negative consequences, from allowing patient access to visit notes, according to a study published in the Oct. 1 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Respiratory Virus Patterns ID'd for Urban, Suburban Infants

MONDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Compared with babies living in more suburban locations, those living in inner-city areas tend to have different patterns of viral respiratory illness, according to a study published online Sept. 25 in the Journal of Infectious Diseases.

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