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Category: Neurology | Monthly Briefing

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October 2012 Briefing - Neurology

Last Updated: November 01, 2012.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Neurology for October 2012. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Early Behavioral Intervention 'Normalizes' Brain Pattern in ASD

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 31 (HealthDay News) -- For young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), early behavioral intervention is associated with normalized brain activity patterns, which correlate with improvements in social behavior, according to research published in the November issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry.

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Only Omega-3s From Fish Tied to Lower Cerebrovascular Risk

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Intake of omega-3 fatty acids from fish, but not circulating biomarkers or supplements, correlates with modestly reduced cerebrovascular risk, according to a meta-analysis published online Oct. 30 in BMJ.

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Genetic Marker Associated With Smoking Linked to ADHD

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 31 (HealthDay News) -- A genetic marker previously identified as associated with smoking may also be associated with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to a study published online Oct. 29 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

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Latrepirdine Not Effective in Huntington's Disease

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Although safe and well tolerated, the experimental small molecule latrepirdine does not improve cognition after six months of treatment in patients with mild-to-moderate Huntington's disease (HD), according to a study published online Oct. 29 in the Archives of Neurology.

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ApoE ε3 Is Most Common ApoE Among Oldest Old

TUESDAY, Oct. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Most nonagenarians carry the ApoE ε3 genotype and few carry the ApoE ε4 genotype, with no association noted between the ApoE ε4 allele and quality of life (QOL), according to a study published in the October issue of the Journal of the American Medical Directors Association.

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U.S. Medicare Spending on Elderly Has Outpaced Canada's

TUESDAY, Oct. 30 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. Medicare spending on the elderly has grown nearly three times faster than its Canadian counterpart, according to a study published online Oct. 29 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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Children With Migraine at Risk for Poor School Performance

MONDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- Children with migraine are significantly more likely to have poor performance at school, according to a study published in the Oct. 30 issue of Neurology.

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Brain Volume Rebounds Within Days of Alcohol Abstinence

FRIDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Gray matter (GM) volume in the brains of alcohol-dependent patients begins to recover within days of alcohol abstinence, according to a study published online Oct. 16 in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research.

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Study Confirms Stroke Survivors Continuing to Smoke Fare Worse

THURSDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Stroke patients who are current or ex-smokers are at greater risk of death or another stroke or heart attack than stroke patients who never smoked, though the risk in ex-smokers is smaller, according to a study published online Oct. 25 in Stroke.

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Poor Physical Performance Linked to Dementia in Over-90s

THURSDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Poor physical performance is associated with increased odds of dementia among the oldest old, according to a study published online Oct. 22 in the Archives of Neurology.

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Timing of Hormone Therapy Use Impacts Alzheimer's Risk

THURSDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Use of hormone therapy (HT) within five years of menopause is associated with a reduction in the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD), according to a study published online Oct. 24 in Neurology.

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Two Face-Selective Regions ID'd in the Fusiform Gyrus

THURSDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Electrical stimulation of two closely-spaced areas in the fusiform gyrus region of the brain (mid and posterior fusiform [mFus and pFus]) causes a profound change in perception that is specific for the face, implicating these areas in facial recognition, according to a study published in the Oct. 24 issue of The Journal of Neuroscience.

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Fycompa Approved for Partial Onset Seizures

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Fycompa (perampanel) tablets have been approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration to treat partial onset seizures in people aged 12 and older who have epilepsy.

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Exercise Cuts Atrophy, White Matter Lesion Load in Elderly

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 24 (HealthDay News) -- In older adults, physical activity is associated with less brain atrophy and white matter lesion (WML) load, according to a study published in the Oct. 23 issue of Neurology.

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Single Bout of Exercise Benefits Children With ADHD

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 24 (HealthDay News) -- A single bout of moderate intensity aerobic exercise may improve neurocognitive function and inhibitory control for children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to a study published online Oct. 19 in The Journal of Pediatrics.

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Genuine Very Large Effects in Trials Rare in Medicine

TUESDAY, Oct. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Large treatment effects are most likely to be found in small studies, with the effect diminishing with additional trials, according to research published in the Oct. 24 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Extradural Motor Cortex Stimulation Safe in Parkinson's

TUESDAY, Oct. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Extradural motor cortex stimulation seems safe and moderately improves symptoms in Parkinson's patients one year after implantation, according to a study published in the October issue of Neurosurgery.

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Social Outcomes Good for Most Pediatric Brain Tumor Survivors

FRIDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- While the majority of survivors of pediatric embryonal tumors display positive social outcomes several years after diagnosis and treatment, specific risk factors may affect social adjustment and behavior over the long term, according to research published online Oct. 15 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Intracranial Tumors Can Be Resected Safely in Elderly

FRIDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Elderly patients do not have poorer short-term outcomes after surgical resection of primary or metastatic intracranial tumors, after accounting for other risk factors, according to research published online Oct. 12 in Cancer.

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Children With Autism Lack Language to Explain Behavior

FRIDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Unlike typically developing children, children with autism do not use language areas of the brain to identify socially inappropriate behavior, according to a study published online Oct. 17 in PLoS One.

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Return to Work Difficult for Doctors on Sick Leave

THURSDAY, Oct. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Returning to work after a prolonged sick leave for physical or mental health problems, or drug or alcohol problems, is difficult for doctors, who describe self-stigmatization and fear a negative response on their return to work, according to a study published online Oct. 15 in BMJ Open.

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Post-Bleed Hydrocephalus Risk Up in Low-Income Preemies

THURSDAY, Oct. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Preterm neonates born to low-income parents have a disproportionately high risk of developing posthemorrhagic hydrocephalus (PHH) that requires multiple surgeries and extensive follow-up, according to research published online Sept. 28 in Pediatric Neurosurgery.

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Stroke Risk Up With Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Use

THURSDAY, Oct. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) is associated with an increased risk of intracerebral and intracranial hemorrhage, according to a study published online Oct. 17 in Neurology.

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Alzheimer's Symptoms Relapse Risk High After Halting Drug

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with Alzheimer's disease and psychosis or agitation-aggression who initially respond to antipsychotic drugs are more likely to relapse if treatment is discontinued, according to a study published in the Oct. 18 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Criteria Variable for Concussion Diagnosis in College Athletes

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 17 (HealthDay News) -- For college athletes, diagnosed concussions are associated with a specific contact event about two-thirds of the time, and diagnosis is often based on self-reported symptoms after a variable delay, according to a study published online Oct. 2 in the Journal of Neurosurgery.

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β-Amyloid Load Linked to Decline in Memory for Elderly

TUESDAY, Oct. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Elevated cerebral β-amyloid (Aβ) load is associated with greater decline in episodic and working memory for healthy and cognitively normal older adults over an 18-month period, with a larger effect than that seen for the APOE ε4 allele, according to research published in the Oct. 16 issue of Neurology.

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Even Modest Sleep Increase Improves Child Behavior

MONDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- For children aged 7 to 11 years, a moderate increase in sleep correlates with improvement in emotional regulation and alertness, while the opposite effects are observed with sleep restriction, according to a study published online Oct. 15 in Pediatrics.

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Decline in Pulmonary Function Leads to Cognitive Decline

THURSDAY, Oct. 11 (HealthDay News) -- For older adults, decreases in pulmonary function lead to subsequent declines in cognitive function, according to a study published in the September issue of Psychological Science.

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Impact of Negative News on Stress Reactivity Explored

THURSDAY, Oct. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Negative news appears to have an impact on stress reactivity and memory in women, more so than in men, according to a study published online Oct. 10 in PLoS One.

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Hypnotizability Affected by Brain's Functional Connectivity

THURSDAY, Oct. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Functional differences in brain connectivity may explain why some individuals are more or less hypnotizable, according to a study published in the October issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Increasing Stroke Incidence Noted at Younger Age

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Stroke incidence seems to be increasing in younger age groups, with the trend seen in both black and white patients, according to a study published online Oct. 8 in Neurology.

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Cannabis Relieves Muscle Stiffness in Multiple Sclerosis

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Cannabis extract (CE) is effective at treating muscle stiffness in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS), according to a study published online July 12 in the Journal of Neurology, Neurosurgery & Psychiatry.

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Low-Dose Aspirin Use Shows Neuroprotective Effect in Women

TUESDAY, Oct. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Daily low-dose aspirin treatment may reduce global cognitive decline in older women at high risk for cardiovascular disease, according to a study published online Oct. 3 in BMJ Open.

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Retinal Hemorrhage Pattern Can Predict Inflicted Brain Injury

TUESDAY, Oct. 9 (HealthDay News) -- In children under the age of 3, a high dot-blot count for retinal hemorrhages (RHs) is a strong predictor of inflicted traumatic brain injury (ITBI) rather than accidental traumatic brain injury (ATBI), according to research published online Oct. 8 in Pediatrics.

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Serum Lycopene Inversely Linked to Risk of Stroke in Men

MONDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- High serum concentrations of lycopene correlate with a significantly reduced risk of stroke in men, according to a study published in the Oct. 9 issue of Neurology.

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Prenatal Psychotropic Meds Affect Infant Language

MONDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal mood and exposure to serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs) in pregnancy affect development of the infant speech perception system, according to a study published online Oct. 8 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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ADHD Risk Increased With Maternal Mercury Exposure

MONDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- The risk of developing attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) is higher with low-level prenatal mercury exposure, but lower with maternal fish consumption during pregnancy, according to a study published online Oct. 8 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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New Drug Reduces Strokes After Aneurysm Surgery

MONDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- An investigational drug that disrupts neurotoxic signaling pathways is safe and effective in reducing strokes in patients undergoing surgery for a brain aneurysm, according to a study published online Oct. 8 in The Lancet Neurology.

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Delayed Auditory Processing Found in Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

FRIDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Preschool children with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) display delays in auditory processing, which may serve as a useful neural marker of information processing difficulties, according to research published in the October issue of Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research.

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Limiting the Problem of Missing Data Urged for Clinical Trials

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Missing data compromise inferences from clinical trials, and due to the problematic nature of compensation with analysis methods, the importance of avoiding missing data in clinical trials is paramount, according to a special report published in the Oct. 4 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Hypertension in Pregnancy May Affect Offspring's Cognition

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Men born of mothers who were hypertensive in pregnancy have lower cognitive abilities and greater cognitive decline in old age, according to a study published online Oct. 3 in Neurology.

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Measures of Retinal Thickness Reflect CNS Pathology in MS

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 3 (HealthDay News) -- In patients with multiple sclerosis (MS) without a history of optic neuritis, retinal measures reflect global central nervous system pathology, according to a study published online Oct. 1 in the Archives of Neurology.

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Mexiletine Shows Promise for Rare Nondystrophic Myotonias

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 3 (HealthDay News) -- There is preliminary evidence that mexiletine is effective for patients with rare nondystrophic myotonias (NDMs), according to a study published in the Oct. 3 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Fertility Treatment Linked to Multiple Sclerosis Worsening

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Fertility treatment is associated with a higher risk of multiple sclerosis (MS) exacerbations, which is linked to the increase in reproductive hormones affecting immune function, according to a study published online Oct. 3 in the Annals of Neurology.

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Observation Units Could Save $3.1 Billion Nationally Per Year

TUESDAY, Oct. 2 (HealthDay News) -- The addition of observation units to U.S. hospitals which do not currently have them in place could save $3.1 billion nationally per year in health care costs, according to a study published online Sept. 26 in Health Affairs.

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Patients Benefit From Access to Physician Notes

MONDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Patients report clinically relevant benefits and minimal concerns, while doctors do not experience negative consequences, from allowing patient access to visit notes, according to a study published in the Oct. 1 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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