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Category: Psychiatry | Monthly Briefing

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October 2012 Briefing - Psychiatry

Last Updated: November 01, 2012.

 

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Here are what the editors at HealthDay consider to be the most important developments in Psychiatry for October 2012. This roundup includes the latest research news from journal articles, as well as the FDA approvals and regulatory changes that are the most likely to affect clinical practice.

Early Behavioral Intervention 'Normalizes' Brain Pattern in ASD

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 31 (HealthDay News) -- For young children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD), early behavioral intervention is associated with normalized brain activity patterns, which correlate with improvements in social behavior, according to research published in the November issue of the Journal of the American Academy of Child & Adolescent Psychiatry.

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Genetic Marker Associated With Smoking Linked to ADHD

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 31 (HealthDay News) -- A genetic marker previously identified as associated with smoking may also be associated with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to a study published online Oct. 29 in the Archives of Disease in Childhood.

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Sustained Release Naltrexone Effective, Safe for Opioid Users

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 31 (HealthDay News) -- Sustained release technologies for administering the opioid antagonist naltrexone (SRX) seem to be effective with an acceptable adverse event profile, according to a review published online Oct. 22 in the British Journal of Clinical Pharmacology.

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Quality of Life for Cancer Survivors Depends on Type

TUESDAY, Oct. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Survivors of cancers are more likely to report poor physical and mental health-related quality of life (HRQOL), compared with adults without cancer, with considerable variation noted for different types of cancers, according to a study published online Oct. 30 in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention.

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Children With Autism Have Normal Development at 6 Months

TUESDAY, Oct. 30 (HealthDay News) -- The development of children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is similar to children without the disorder at 6 months of age, suggesting that ASD has a pre-clinical phase of varying duration when detection may be difficult, according to a study published online Oct. 30 in Child Development.

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U.S. Medicare Spending on Elderly Has Outpaced Canada's

TUESDAY, Oct. 30 (HealthDay News) -- U.S. Medicare spending on the elderly has grown nearly three times faster than its Canadian counterpart, according to a study published online Oct. 29 in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

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ApoE ε3 Is Most Common ApoE Among Oldest Old

TUESDAY, Oct. 30 (HealthDay News) -- Most nonagenarians carry the ApoE ε3 genotype and few carry the ApoE ε4 genotype, with no association noted between the ApoE ε4 allele and quality of life (QOL), according to a study published in the October issue of the Journal of the American Medical Directors Association.

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Hypnosis Cuts Hot Flashes in Postmenopausal Women

MONDAY, Oct. 29 (HealthDay News) -- For postmenopausal women, clinical hypnosis is associated with significant reductions in self-reported and physiologically measured hot flashes, according to a study published online Oct. 22 in Menopause.

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Brain Volume Rebounds Within Days of Alcohol Abstinence

FRIDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Gray matter (GM) volume in the brains of alcohol-dependent patients begins to recover within days of alcohol abstinence, according to a study published online Oct. 16 in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research.

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High Reliability for Hypersexual Disorder Diagnostic Criteria

FRIDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Proposed criteria for hypersexual disorder (HD) show high reliability and validity, according to results of a field trial conducted by the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5) Work Group on Sexual and Gender Identity Disorders, published online Oct. 4 in The Journal of Sexual Medicine.

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Prevalence, Risks for Sexual Dysfunction Vary by Veteran Age

FRIDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- For Iraq/Afghanistan veterans, the prevalence and risk factors for sexual dysfunction (SD) vary with age, according to a study published online Oct. 22 in The Journal of Sexual Medicine.

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Family Hx, Heavy Drinking Have Distinct Cue Reactivity Paths

FRIDAY, Oct. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Family history and heavy drinking correlate with altered neural activity in response to alcohol cues, although there is no interaction between the two, according to a study published online Oct. 18 in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research.

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Timing of Hormone Therapy Use Impacts Alzheimer's Risk

THURSDAY, Oct. 25 (HealthDay News) -- Use of hormone therapy (HT) within five years of menopause is associated with a reduction in the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD), according to a study published online Oct. 24 in Neurology.

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Risk of Suicide Ideation Up for Recently Victimized Teens

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 24 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescents exposed to recent victimization have an increased risk for suicide ideation, with a higher risk for those exposed to polyvictimization, according to a study published online Oct. 22 in the Archives of Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine.

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Single Bout of Exercise Benefits Children With ADHD

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 24 (HealthDay News) -- A single bout of moderate intensity aerobic exercise may improve neurocognitive function and inhibitory control for children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), according to a study published online Oct. 19 in The Journal of Pediatrics.

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Genuine Very Large Effects in Trials Rare in Medicine

TUESDAY, Oct. 23 (HealthDay News) -- Large treatment effects are most likely to be found in small studies, with the effect diminishing with additional trials, according to research published in the Oct. 24 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

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Children With Autism Lack Language to Explain Behavior

FRIDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- Unlike typically developing children, children with autism do not use language areas of the brain to identify socially inappropriate behavior, according to a study published online Oct. 17 in PLoS One.

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Social Outcomes Good for Most Pediatric Brain Tumor Survivors

FRIDAY, Oct. 19 (HealthDay News) -- While the majority of survivors of pediatric embryonal tumors display positive social outcomes several years after diagnosis and treatment, specific risk factors may affect social adjustment and behavior over the long term, according to research published online Oct. 15 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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In Depression, Discrimination Has Adverse Social Impact

THURSDAY, Oct. 18 (HealthDay News) -- For individuals with major depressive disorder, discrimination adversely affects social participation and vocational integration, according to a study published online Oct. 18 in The Lancet.

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Stroke Risk Up With Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitor Use

THURSDAY, Oct. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) is associated with an increased risk of intracerebral and intracranial hemorrhage, according to a study published online Oct. 17 in Neurology.

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Return to Work Difficult for Doctors on Sick Leave

THURSDAY, Oct. 18 (HealthDay News) -- Returning to work after a prolonged sick leave for physical or mental health problems, or drug or alcohol problems, is difficult for doctors, who describe self-stigmatization and fear a negative response on their return to work, according to a study published online Oct. 15 in BMJ Open.

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Alzheimer's Symptoms Relapse Risk High After Halting Drug

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with Alzheimer's disease and psychosis or agitation-aggression who initially respond to antipsychotic drugs are more likely to relapse if treatment is discontinued, according to a study published in the Oct. 18 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Women With RA Report Lower Sexual Function

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has negative effects on sexual function in women, with depressive symptoms and disease severity linked to the degree of sexual dysfunction, according to a study published in the October issue of The Journal of Sexual Medicine.

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Excess Mortality for Alcohol-Dependent, Especially Women

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 17 (HealthDay News) -- Alcohol-dependent adults, particularly women, have excess mortality, according to a study published online Oct. 16 in Alcoholism: Clinical & Experimental Research.

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Increased Substance Use Seen After Weight Loss Surgery

TUESDAY, Oct. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Patients who undergo weight loss surgery may have an increased risk for substance use after surgery, according to a study published online Oct. 15 in the Archives of Surgery.

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Psychopathological Sequelae of ADHD Extend to Adulthood

MONDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- For children with attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) without conduct disorders, the psychopathological consequences extend into adulthood, although most of these consequences begin in adolescence, according to a study published online Oct. 15 in the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Even Modest Sleep Increase Improves Child Behavior

MONDAY, Oct. 15 (HealthDay News) -- For children aged 7 to 11 years, a moderate increase in sleep correlates with improvement in emotional regulation and alertness, while the opposite effects are observed with sleep restriction, according to a study published online Oct. 15 in Pediatrics.

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Hypnotizability Affected by Brain's Functional Connectivity

THURSDAY, Oct. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Functional differences in brain connectivity may explain why some individuals are more or less hypnotizable, according to a study published in the October issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Interventions Helpful for Breast Cancer-Induced Menopause

THURSDAY, Oct. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) and physical exercise improve endocrine and urinary symptoms as well as physical functioning in patients with breast cancer treatment-induced menopause, according to research published online Oct. 8 in the Journal of Clinical Oncology.

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Impact of Negative News on Stress Reactivity Explored

THURSDAY, Oct. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Negative news appears to have an impact on stress reactivity and memory in women, more so than in men, according to a study published online Oct. 10 in PLoS One.

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BDNF Hemizygosity Linked to Psychopathology

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 10 (HealthDay News) -- In several patients with psychopathology, alterations in genomic copy number have been identified in a critical region involving the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) gene, which is suspected of being causative in psychiatric disorders, according to a study published online Oct. 8 in the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Relocation Offers Mental Health Benefit for Some Teen Girls

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 10 (HealthDay News) -- Adolescent boys and boys and girls with health-related vulnerabilities who move from high-poverty public housing arrangements to low-poverty private apartments do not experience mental health benefits, although some girls without health vulnerabilities do benefit, according to research published online Oct. 8 in the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Diverse Forms of Distress Have Distinct Impact in Diabetes

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 10 (HealthDay News) -- In primary care patients with type 2 diabetes, depressive symptoms (DS) are predictive of future lifestyle-oriented self-management behaviors, while diabetes-related distress (DRD) predicts glycemic control, possibly due to medication adherence, according to research published online Oct. 1 in Diabetes Care.

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Low-Dose Aspirin Use Shows Neuroprotective Effect in Women

TUESDAY, Oct. 9 (HealthDay News) -- Daily low-dose aspirin treatment may reduce global cognitive decline in older women at high risk for cardiovascular disease, according to a study published online Oct. 3 in BMJ Open.

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Prenatal Psychotropic Meds Affect Infant Language

MONDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Maternal mood and exposure to serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SRIs) in pregnancy affect development of the infant speech perception system, according to a study published online Oct. 8 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Nearly Half of Children With Autism Wander

MONDAY, Oct. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Nearly half of children with autism spectrum disorders (ASDs) wander away, with considerable numbers of them facing physical danger, according to a study published online Oct. 8 in Pediatrics.

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Deployment Affects Mental Health of Relief Workers

FRIDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Humanitarian relief workers have increased levels of anxiety and depression after being deployed, according to a study published online Sept. 12 in PLoS One.

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Thin-Ideal Internalization Influenced by Genetic Factors

FRIDAY, Oct. 5 (HealthDay News) -- Thin-ideal internalization is significantly influenced by genetic and non-shared environmental factors, according to a study published online Oct. 3 in the International Journal of Eating Disorders.

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For Obese Teens, Aerobic Fitness Provides Mental Health Benefits

THURSDAY, Oct. 4 (HealthDay News) -- An aerobic exercise program, consisting of stationary bike cycling to either music or an interactive video game, provides many psychological benefits for overweight and obese adolescents, according to a study published online Sept. 30 in the Journal of Pediatric Psychology.

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Limiting the Problem of Missing Data Urged for Clinical Trials

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Missing data compromise inferences from clinical trials, and due to the problematic nature of compensation with analysis methods, the importance of avoiding missing data in clinical trials is paramount, according to a special report published in the Oct. 4 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine.

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Insomnia Linked to Costly Workplace Accidents, Errors

WEDNESDAY, Oct. 3 (HealthDay News) -- Insomnia-related workplace accidents and errors are more costly and more frequent than accidents and errors caused by other chronic conditions, according to a study published online Oct. 1 in the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Many Juvenile Detainees Have Psychiatric Disorders Later On

TUESDAY, Oct. 2 (HealthDay News) -- As many as half of the children and adolescents who are in juvenile detention have psychiatric disorders five years after release, according to a study published in the October issue of the Archives of General Psychiatry.

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Observation Units Could Save $3.1 Billion Nationally Per Year

TUESDAY, Oct. 2 (HealthDay News) -- The addition of observation units to U.S. hospitals which do not currently have them in place could save $3.1 billion nationally per year in health care costs, according to a study published online Sept. 26 in Health Affairs.

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Tolerance for Ambiguity May Drive Adolescent Risk-Taking

MONDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Compared with adults, adolescents tolerate ambiguous conditions, which may underlie their risk-taking behavior, according to a study published online Oct. 1 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

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Patients Benefit From Access to Physician Notes

MONDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Patients report clinically relevant benefits and minimal concerns, while doctors do not experience negative consequences, from allowing patient access to visit notes, according to a study published in the Oct. 1 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine.

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Melatonin Effective for Sleep in Patients Taking β-Blockers

MONDAY, Oct. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Patients taking β-blockers for hypertension, which can disturb sleep, have improved sleep quality with melatonin treatment, according to a study published in the Oct. 1 issue of SLEEP.

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