Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Dermatology | Family Medicine | Gastroenterology | Nursing | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Patch Testing Can ID Food, Additives That Contribute to IBS

Last Updated: November 01, 2012.

 

Symptom improvement noted in some who avoided the food/food additives to which they reacted

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Patch testing may identify allergies to food or food additives that may be responsible for the symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome, according to a study published online Oct. 26 in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

THURSDAY, Nov. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Patch testing may identify allergies to food or food additives that may be responsible for the symptoms of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), according to a study published online Oct. 26 in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

Michael B. Stierstorfer, M.D., from East Penn Dermatology in North Wales, Pa., and colleagues performed skin patch testing to common allergenic foods and food additives on 51 individuals with a history of or symptoms suggestive of IBS to examine whether these allergens were responsible for the symptoms of IBS and whether guided avoidance could alleviate these symptoms.

The researchers found that 30 of the 51 study participants showed at least one doubtful or positive patch test result. Symptomatic improvement, ranging from slight to great was reported by 14 participants upon avoidance of the foods/food additives to which they reacted.

"In this proof-of-concept case series, we provide evidence that food-related type-4 hypersensitivity should be considered in the pathogenesis of IBS and chronic undifferentiated IBS-like symptoms," the authors write. "If our observations are supported by further study, food/food additive patch testing may provide a valuable addition to the evaluation and treatment of patients with symptoms of IBS."

One author disclosed having filed a patent application for food and food additives skin patch testing for IBS and undifferentiated gastrointestinal disease.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Optimal Delivery Time for Twins Is 38 Weeks or Later Next: UV-Independent Pathway ID'd in Those at Risk for Melanoma

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.