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Obesity Ups Complications After Total Knee Arthroplasty

Last Updated: November 01, 2012.

 

Increase in odds of infection, deep infection requiring surgical debridement, revision for any reason

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For patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty, obesity correlates with increased rates of complications, including infection, deep infection, and revision for any reason, according to research published in the Oct. 17 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

THURSDAY, Nov. 1 (HealthDay News) -- For patients undergoing total knee arthroplasty, obesity correlates with increased rates of complications, including infection, deep infection, and revision for any reason, according to research published in the Oct. 17 issue of The Journal of Bone & Joint Surgery.

Gino M.M.J. Kerkhoffs, M.D., Ph.D., from the University of Amsterdam, and colleagues conducted a systematic review of the literature and meta-analysis to examine whether obesity has a negative impact on outcome after primary total knee arthroplasty.

Twenty studies were included in the data analysis. The researchers found that 14 studies involving 15,276 patients reported the presence of any infection, with infection occurring significantly more often in obese patients (odds ratio, 1.90). Nine studies involving 5,061 patients reported deep infection requiring surgical debridement, which was seen significantly more often in obese patients (odds ratio, 2.38). Eleven studies involving 12,101 patients reported revision of the total knee arthroplasty, defined as exchange or removal of the components for any reason, and this occurred significantly more often in obese patients (odds ratio, 1.30).

"We conclude that obesity had a negative influence on the outcome of patients treated with total knee arthroplasty, with more short-term complications and poorer long-term outcome compared with non-obese patients," the authors write.

One or more of the authors disclosed financial ties to an entity in the biomedical arena.

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Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


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