Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Cardiology | Family Medicine | Geriatrics | Nursing | Pharmacy | Rheumatology | Anesthesiology & Pain | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

NSAIDS Don’t Affect C-Reactive Protein Levels in RA Patients

Last Updated: November 01, 2012.

 

Stratified analysis of specific NSAIDs show significant effect; naproxen tied to decrease in CRP

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Overall, oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs do not have an effect on C-reactive protein levels in patients with rheumatoid arthritis, according to research published in the November issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

THURSDAY, Nov. 1 (HealthDay News) -- Overall, oral nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) do not have an effect on C-reactive protein (CRP) levels in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA), according to research published in the November issue of Arthritis & Rheumatism.

Simon Tarp, from the Copenhagen University Hospital in Denmark, and colleagues reviewed the literature to identify parallel-group, randomized, placebo-controlled trials of oral NSAID therapy in RA patients for which there were extractable CRP data to evaluate the effects of oral NSAIDs on CRP levels. Using a random-effects model for meta-analysis, the overall change in CRP levels was estimated.

The researchers found that, in the 19 included trials involving 10 different NSAIDs, there was no overall effect on CRP levels. Based on a prespecified, stratified analysis, varying effects on the CRP level were noted for different NSAIDs: lumiracoxib correlated with a significant and consistent increase in the CRP level (P = 0.037), while naproxen correlated with a significant and consistent decline in the CRP level (P = 0.022).

"We conclude that NSAIDs as a group have no effect on the CRP level, although they are analgesic and may be anti-inflammatory in RA assessed by parameters other than the CRP level," the authors write. "Given the proposed cardioprotective properties of naproxen, and based on the present analysis, we suggest that this nonselective NSAID could be a potential choice for patients with cardiac risk factors in rheumatology practice."

Mundipharma International sponsored the study; Merck & Company provided the unpublished data and reviewed the manuscript.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Combo Therapy Can Be First-Line Approach in Manic Episodes Next: CDC: Diabetes Mortality Declining in Youths

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.