Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Family Medicine | Geriatrics | Nursing | Orthopedics | Rheumatology | Anesthesiology & Pain | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Factors Impacting Benefit of Exercise in Knee OA Identified

Last Updated: November 02, 2012.

 

Self-reported knee instability, fear of exercise linked to response to therapeutic exercise

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
For patients with knee osteoarthritis, self-reported knee instability and fear of physical activity correlate with the likelihood of treatment response following a therapeutic exercise program, according to a study published in the November issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

FRIDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) -- For patients with knee osteoarthritis, self-reported knee instability and fear of physical activity correlate with the likelihood of treatment response following a therapeutic exercise program, according to a study published in the November issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

G. Kelley Fitzgerald, P.T., Ph.D., from the University of Pittsburg, and colleagues evaluated 152 patients with knee osteoarthritis to examine how therapeutic exercise-linked changes in physical and psychological factors correlate with changes in pain and function. Participants completed an exercise program incorporating lower extremity strengthening, stretching, range of motion, balance and agility, and aerobic exercises. The association between change from baseline to two-month follow-up in various factors and treatment response (defined as a minimum of 20 percent improvement from baseline) was assessed, after adjustment for potentially confounding variables.

The researchers found that, after adjustment, the only two factors that were significantly associated with treatment response were change in self-reported knee instability (odds ratio, 1.67) and fear of physical activity (odds ratio, 0.93).

"This finding may suggest that methods to improve self-reported knee instability and fear of physical activity might further enhance the effects of therapeutic exercise for patients with knee osteoarthritis who have these problems," the authors write. "Continued work is needed to confirm the associations between changes in physical and psychological factors and treatment response to therapeutic exercise for people with knee osteoarthritis."

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: CDC: Diabetes Mortality Declining in Youths Next: Rates, Causes of Spinal Surgery-Tied Mortality Quantified

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.