Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Family Medicine | Internal Medicine | Neurology | Nursing | Orthopedics | Anesthesiology & Pain | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Sedentary Behavior Worsens Decline in Cerebral Palsy

Last Updated: November 02, 2012.

 

Physical activity may improve muscle function and reduce chronic disease

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Adults with cerebral palsy may be able to reduce declines in muscle strength, improve function, and reduce cardiovascular and metabolic disease by avoiding sedentary behavior and engaging in physical activity, according to a study published online Oct. 23 in Obesity Reviews.

FRIDAY, Nov. 2 (HealthDay News) -- Adults with cerebral palsy may be able to reduce declines in muscle strength, improve function, and reduce cardiovascular and metabolic disease by avoiding sedentary behavior and engaging in physical activity, according to a study published online Oct. 23 in Obesity Reviews.

Mark D. Peterson, Ph.D., from the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor, and colleagues describe the impact of early muscle wasting, obesity, and lifestyle intervention on premature declines in function among adults with cerebral palsy, noting that premature decline is usually attributed to weakness, spasticity, orthopedic abnormalities, chronic pain, and fatigue.

The researchers note that the extent of atrophy and weakness in adults with cerebral palsy is likely influenced by the degree of sedentary behavior, which greatly increases their risk of cardiometabolic disease, early mortality, premature sarcopenia, and functional deterioration. The decline in strength is strongly associated with declines in functional capacity, and further declines can be avoided by early detection and physical activity. The authors suggest that reducing sedentary behavior is the best first line of defense against many of the secondary comorbidities.

"In conjunction with the standard physical and occupational therapies prescribed for managing gait/mobility deficits, spasticity and range-of-motion in this population, participation in physical activity and progressive exercise is absolutely vital to prevent secondary muscle pathology and cardiometabolic comorbidity throughout adulthood," Peterson and colleagues conclude.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: New Autoinflammatory Disease Linked to NOD2 Mutations ID'd Next: Additional Genes Linked to Inflammatory Bowel Disease

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.