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HTN Risk Up for African-American Live Kidney Donors

Last Updated: November 06, 2012.

 

More than 50 percent of those donors with hypertension are untreated

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African-American live kidney donors have a significantly increased risk of hypertension compared with non-donors, according to a study published online Oct. 24 in the American Journal of Transplantation.

TUESDAY, Nov. 6 (HealthDay News) -- African-American live kidney donors have a significantly increased risk of hypertension compared with non-donors, according to a study published online Oct. 24 in the American Journal of Transplantation.

To examine the risk of hypertension and kidney disease in donors, Mona D. Doshi, M.D., of Wayne State University in Detroit, and associates evaluated 103 African-American live kidney donors, who donated between 1993 and 2006 at two transplant centers, and 235 matched non-donors from the Coronary Artery Risk Development in Young Adults prospective cohort study. Donors and non-donors were followed for a mean of 6.8 or 6.4 years, respectively.

The researchers found that donors had a significantly increased hypertension risk compared with non-donors (40.8 versus 17.9 percent; relative risk, 2.4). Just over half (52.4 percent) of the donors with hypertension were untreated. Of the donors, 15.5 percent had an estimated glomerular filtration rate <60 mL/min/1.73 m², 5.8 percent had microalbuminuria, and none of them were on dialysis.

"The data from our retrospective study demonstrates that live kidney donation is associated with increased risk of hypertension in African-Americans," the authors write. "At this time, results of the current study should not dissuade African-Americans from being a live kidney donor, but does raise awareness about the importance of donor follow-up."

One of the authors disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry.

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Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


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