Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Family Medicine | Gastroenterology | Nursing | Oncology | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

High Glycemic Load Linked to Worse Colon Cancer Survival

Last Updated: November 08, 2012.

 

Glycemic load tied to worse survival in obese, overweight; link also seen for carbohydrate intake

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Patients with advanced colon cancer with high glycemic load and who consume high levels of carbohydrates during and after chemotherapy have worse survival, according to a study published online Nov. 7 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

THURSDAY, Nov. 8 (HealthDay News) -- Patients with advanced colon cancer with high glycemic load and who consume high levels of carbohydrates during and after chemotherapy have worse survival, according to a study published online Nov. 7 in the Journal of the National Cancer Institute.

Jeffrey A. Meyerhardt, M.D., M.P.H., from the Dana-Farber Cancer Institute in Boston, and colleagues examined the association of dietary glycemic load and total carbohydrate intake with recurrence and survival in 1,011 stage III colon cancer patients. Diet was assessed during and six months after participating in an adjuvant chemotherapy trial via a dietary questionnaire.

The researchers found that increased dietary glycemic load was associated with significantly worse disease-free survival (adjusted hazard ratio, 1.79 comparing the highest and lowest quintiles). Increased glycemic load was also associated with significantly worse recurrence-free and overall survival. Worse survival was specific to those who were overweight or obese, with a body mass index of 25 kg/m² or greater (hazard ratio, 2.26). Increased total carbohydrate intake was also associated with significantly worse disease-free, recurrence-free, and overall survival.

"These findings support the role of energy balance factors in colon cancer progression and may offer potential opportunities to improve patient survival," Meyerhardt and colleagues conclude.

The study was partially funded by Pharmacia & Upjohn Company, now Pfizer Oncology.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Maternal Age at Menopause Tied to Daughter's Ovarian Reserve Next: Disc Disease Severity Doesn't Predict Surgical Outcomes

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.