Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Dermatology | Nursing | Pathology | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Moderately Dysplastic Nevi Re-Excision Not Necessary

Last Updated: November 12, 2012.

 

Favorable long-term outcome in patients with histologically dysplastic nevi without re-excision

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Re-excision of mildly or moderately histologically dysplastic nevi that approach a microscopic border may not be necessary, as favorable long-term outcomes are achieved without re-excision, according to a study published online Nov. 5 in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

MONDAY, Nov. 12 (HealthDay News) -- Re-excision of mildly or moderately histologically dysplastic nevi (HDN) that approach a microscopic border may not be necessary, as favorable long-term outcomes are achieved without re-excision, according to a study published online Nov. 5 in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology.

Thomas Hocker, M.D., of the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn., and colleagues conducted a retrospective study involving 115 patients who had an HDN that extended to within 0.2 mm of a microscopic punch, shave, or excision border and was not re-excised. The rate of melanoma development was assessed over time.

Of the 115 dysplastic nevi, 66 were mildly dysplastic, 42 were moderately dysplastic, and seven were severely dysplastic. During an average follow-up of 17.4 years, the researchers found that no patient developed metastatic melanoma or melanoma at the site of removal of an HDN, including in the 63.4 percent of patients followed for more than 20 years.

"The long-term outcomes in our cohort provide evidence that routine re-excision of HDNs with mild or moderate dysplasia may not be necessary, if the entire clinically visible lesion is removed, even if the nevus approaches a histologic margin," the authors write. "Avoiding re-excision of these nevi encountered in daily practice would result in fewer surgical procedures, with associated decreases in morbidity, including cosmetic disfigurement, and health care utilization and costs."

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Early-Life Stress Impacts Female Teen Brain Connectivity Next: Study Looks at Autism and Possible Pregnancy Risk Factors

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.