Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Dermatology | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Electronic Skin Has Properties of Natural Skin

Last Updated: November 14, 2012.

 

Can self-heal within about 10 minutes and is pressure- and flexion-sensitive

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
A new material that can self-heal and is pressure- and flexion-sensitive could be used as an electronic skin, according to a study published online Nov. 11 in Nature Nanotechnology.

WEDNESDAY, Nov. 14 (HealthDay News) -- A new material that can self-heal and is pressure- and flexion-sensitive could be used as an electronic skin, according to a study published online Nov. 11 in Nature Nanotechnology.

To design a material that could sense pressure and heal like human skin, Benjamin Chee-Keong Tee, from Stanford University in California, and colleagues created a composite organic polymer embedded with nickel nanostructured microparticles.

The researchers found that the material was self-healing at ambient temperatures, regaining nearly all of its original strength and electrical conductivity within about 10 minutes after rupture. The same sample could also withstand being ruptured in the same place and repaired repeatedly. The electrical conductivity could reach values as high as 40 S per cm−1 by varying the amount of nickel particles. The material was also pressure- and flexion-sensitive and, when placed on a humanoid mannequin, the material could detect varying pressures and changes in the positions of the limbs.

"These results demonstrate that natural skin's repeatable self-healing capability can be mimicked in conductive and piezoresistive materials, thus potentially expanding the scope of applications of current electronic skin systems," Tee and colleagues conclude.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: New Loci Linked to Lung Cancer in Female Asian Never Smokers Next: Higher Quality of Life for Adoptive Parents

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.