CLDN2 interact with alcohol consumption to amplify risk” />

Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Gastroenterology | Pathology | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Gene Variants ID’d in Alcohol-Related, Sporadic Pancreatitis

Last Updated: November 16, 2012.

 

Alleles of X-linked gene CLDN2 interact with alcohol consumption to amplify risk

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Two common genetic risk modifiers have been characterized for sporadic and alcohol-related chronic pancreatitis, according to a study published online Nov. 11 in Nature Genetics.

FRIDAY, Nov. 16 (HealthDay News) -- Two common genetic risk modifiers have been characterized for sporadic and alcohol-related chronic pancreatitis, according to a study published online Nov. 11 in Nature Genetics.

David C. Whitcomb, M.D., Ph.D., from the University of Pittsburgh, and colleagues conducted a two-stage genome-wide study (stage 1: 676 cases and 4,507 controls; stage 2: 910 cases and 4,170 controls) to examine genetic contributions to pancreatitis.

The researchers identified and replicated two associations of genome-wide significance at PRSS1-PRSS2 and X-linked CLDN2. The PRSS1 variant altered expression of the primary trypsinogen gene, likely affecting disease susceptibility. In pancreatic acinar cells, the CLDN2 risk allele correlated with atypical localization of claudin-2. The greatest risk was conferred by the homozygous CLDN2 genotype (hemizygous in males), and there was an interaction noted between the alleles and alcohol consumption, which amplified risk.

"Because risk variants at the PRSS1-PRSS2 locus exert a similar effect in subjects with recurrent acute pancreatitis and those with chronic pancreatitis, it is reasonable to conjecture that variation at rs10273639 or variation at sites in linkage disequilibrium with it directly affects risk for chronic pancreatitis and recurrent acute pancreatitis through its impact on trypsinogen expression," the authors write. "The significant association of the CLDN2 locus with alcohol-related disease suggests that the high-risk allele in the CLDN2 locus may modify risk through a non-trypsin-dependent process."

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Parents Offer Advice for Parenting Overweight Teens Next: Gender Influences Mental Health Literacy, Depression Perception

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.