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Ten-Valent Pneumococcal Conjugate Vaccine Effective

Last Updated: November 16, 2012.

 

Different vaccine schedules are effective, including 2+1 schedule in infants

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The pneumococcal conjugate vaccine containing 10 serotype-specific polysaccharides conjugated to Haemophilus influenza protein D, tetanus toxoid, and diphtheria toxoid as the carrier proteins is effective against invasive pneumococcal disease, including in infants using a 2+1 schedule, according to a study published online Nov. 16 in The Lancet.

FRIDAY, Nov. 16 (HealthDay News) -- The pneumococcal conjugate vaccine containing 10 serotype-specific polysaccharides conjugated to Haemophilus influenza protein D, tetanus toxoid, and diphtheria toxoid as the carrier proteins (PHiD-CV10) is effective against invasive pneumococcal disease, including in infants using a 2+1 schedule, according to a study published online Nov. 16 in The Lancet.

Arto A. Palmu, M.D., from the National Institute for Health and Welfare in Tampere, Finland, and colleagues conducted a cluster-randomized trial in which children aged younger than 19 months received PHiD-CV10 in 52 clusters or hepatitis vaccines as control in 26 clusters. A 3+1 or a 2+1 vaccination schedule was used in infants younger than 7 months at the first vaccination. A 2+1 schedule was used in children aged 7 to 11 months, and those 12 to 18 months of age received a two-dose schedule.

The researchers found that, of the 30,528 participants assessed for the primary objective, 13 culture-confirmed vaccine-type cases of invasive pneumococcal disease were detected (none in the PHiD-CV10 3+1 group; one in the PHiD-CV10 2+1 group; and 12 in the control groups). For PHiD-CV10 3+1, the vaccine effectiveness was estimated at 100 percent, and 92 percent effectiveness was estimated for PHiD-CV10 2+1. In combined PHiD-CV10 infant cohorts there were two cases of any culture-confirmed invasive disease, compared with 14 in the corresponding control cohorts (vaccine effectiveness 93 percent). Seven cases of invasive disease were reported in catch-up cohorts, all of which were in the control group.

"This nationwide trial showed high PHiD-CV10 effectiveness against invasive pneumococcal disease when given in different schedules," the authors write. "For the first time, effectiveness of a 2+1 schedule in infants was confirmed in a clinical trial."

Several authors disclosed financial ties to pharmaceutical companies, including GlaxoSmithKline, which in part funded the study.

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Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


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