Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Family Medicine | Gynecology | Internal Medicine | Neurology | Pediatrics | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

More Support for Vitamin D As Protective Factor in MS

Last Updated: November 19, 2012.

 

But no association for in utero exposure to vitamin D and offspring risk of developing MS

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
There is an inverse association between levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) and the risk of multiple sclerosis (MS), but no association between gestational levels of 25(OH)D and offspring risk of MS, according to a study published in the Nov. 20 issue of Neurology.

MONDAY, Nov. 19 (HealthDay News) -- There is an inverse association between levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25[OH]D) and the risk of multiple sclerosis (MS), but no association between gestational levels of 25(OH)D and offspring risk of MS, according to a study published in the Nov. 20 issue of Neurology.

Jonatan Salzer, M.D., from Umeå University in Sweden, and colleagues examined the correlation between vitamin D levels and MS risk using data from a nested case-control study involving two population-based biobanks with 291,500 samples from 164,000 individuals collected since 1975. Blood samples were identified from MS cases (192, with controls matched in a 2:1 ratio) and gestational samples were collected from pregnant women whose offspring later developed MS (37, matched with control mothers in a 5:1 ratio).

The researchers found that levels of 25(OH)D ≥75 nmol/L correlated with a significantly decreased risk of MS compared with levels <75 nmol/L (odds ratio, 0.39). Offspring exposed to gestational 25(OH)D levels of ≥75 nmol/L versus <75 nmol/L had no significantly decreased risk of MS (odds ratio, 1.8; 95 percent confidence interval, 0.53 to 5.8). During 1976 to 2005, the prevalence of 25(OH)D ≥75 nmol/L gradually decreased in controls.

"This study gives further support for the association between vitamin D status and MS," the authors write. "Our data suggest that vitamin D may act as a protective factor for MS somewhere between late pregnancy and young adulthood."

Several authors disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Personality Traits Explain Some of Placebo Analgesic Effect Next: Testosterone Doesn't Add to Erectile Response With Sildenafil

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.