Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Cardiology | Family Medicine | Infections | Internal Medicine | Nursing | Pathology | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

E. coli O157:H7 Not Found to Up Death, Cardiovascular Events

Last Updated: November 20, 2012.

 

Cardiovascular disease, death not up for those with severe versus no gastroenteritis

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Following a 2000 outbreak of Escherichia coli O157:H7, there has been no increase noted in the risk of cardiovascular disease or death, according to research published online Nov. 19 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

TUESDAY, Nov. 20 (HealthDay News) -- Following a 2000 outbreak of Escherichia coli (E. coli) O157:H7, there has been no increase noted in the risk of cardiovascular disease or death, according to research published online Nov. 19 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

Patricia Hizo-Abes, from Western University in London, Canada, and colleagues examined the risk of cardiovascular disease following an outbreak of E. coli O157:H7 in Walkerton, Canada, in May 2000. Four groups of adults were included in the analyses: 153 with severe gastroenteritis, 414 with mild gastroenteritis, and 331 with no gastroenteritis; all from Walkerton, and 11,263 residents from the surrounding communities who were unaffected by the outbreak.

During 2000 to 2008, the researchers found that 9.7 percent of adults died or experienced a major cardiovascular event. The risk of death or cardiovascular event was not increased for Walkerton participants with severe (hazard ratio [HR], 0.74; 95 percent confidence interval [CI], 0.38 to 1.43) or mild gastroenteritis (HR, 0.64; 95 percent CI, 0.42 to 0.98), compared with residents of the surrounding communities. Participants from Walkerton with mild or severe gastroenteritis had no increased risk of death or cardiovascular event compared to those with no gastroenteritis.

"This study provides evidence that the risk of major cardiovascular events was not higher in Walkerton in the decade following the E. coli O157:H7 outbreak," the authors write. "This may be partly explained by active surveillance and treatment for conditions such as hypertension, which may prevent cardiovascular events."

Two authors have provided medical expert testimony on hemolytic uremic syndrome in the United States.

Abstract
Full Text

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Heart Attack Risk Increases With Unemployment Next: ~40% of Post-Op Complications Occur After Discharge

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.