Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Neurology | Pharmacy | Critical Care | Emergency Medicine | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Citicoline Not Effective for Traumatic Brain Injury

Last Updated: November 20, 2012.

 

No significant improvement in functional or cognitive status versus placebo for mild, severe TBI

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
There is no significant improvement in either functional or cognitive status among patients with traumatic brain injury taking citicoline compared with placebo, according to a study published in the Nov. 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

TUESDAY, Nov. 20 (HealthDay News) -- There is no significant improvement in either functional or cognitive status among patients with traumatic brain injury (TBI) taking citicoline compared with placebo, according to a study published in the Nov. 21 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Ross D. Zafonte, D.O., from Harvard Medical School in Boston, and colleagues conducted a phase 3 randomized trial, the Citicoline Brain Injury Treatment Trial, in which 1,213 patients with complicated mild, moderate, or severe TBI at eight U.S. level 1 trauma centers were randomized to receive a 90-day regimen of daily enteral or oral citicoline (2,000 mg) or placebo. The TBI-Clinical Trials Network Core Battery was used to assess functional and cognitive status at 90 days.

The researchers found that, at the 90-day evaluation, the citicoline and placebo groups did not differ significantly with respect to function and cognitive status (global odds ratio [OR], 0.98; 95 percent confidence interval [CI], 0.83 to 1.15). There was no significant treatment effect by severity (global ORs, 1.14 [95 percent CI, 0.88 to 1.49] for moderate/severe and 0.89 [95 percent CI, 0.72 to 1.49] for complicated mild TBI). Similarly, the citicoline and placebo groups did not differ significantly with respect to the primary outcome at the 180-day evaluation (global OR, 0.87; 95 percent CI, 0.72 to 1.04).

"In conclusion, this large, randomized, blinded study showed that acute and subacute treatment with citicoline did not result in improvement in functional and cognitive status," the authors write. "These findings call into question the use of citicoline for patients with TBI."

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Online Access by Patients to Health Records Ups Utilization Next: HeartWare Device Approved for Heart Transplant Hopefuls

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.