Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Cardiology | Dermatology | Endocrinology | Family Medicine | Geriatrics | Gastroenterology | Gynecology | Infections | AIDS | Internal Medicine | Allergy | Critical Care | Emergency Medicine | Nephrology | Neurology | Oncology | Ophthalmology | Orthopedics | ENT | Pathology | Pediatrics | Psychiatry | Pulmonology | Radiology | Rheumatology | Surgery | Anesthesiology & Pain | Urology | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Five-Hour Protected Sleep Feasible for Medical Interns

Last Updated: December 04, 2012.

 

Interns get more uninterrupted sleep and feel more alert the next day

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Implementation of a five-hour period of protected sleep is feasible for medical interns on long shifts, resulting in interns getting more uninterrupted sleep and feeling more alert the next day, according to a study published in the Dec. 5 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

TUESDAY, Dec. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Implementation of a five-hour period of protected sleep is feasible for medical interns on long shifts, resulting in interns getting more uninterrupted sleep and feeling more alert the next day, according to a study published in the Dec. 5 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Kevin G. Volpp, M.D., Ph.D., from the Philadelphia Veterans Affairs Medical Center, and colleagues randomly assigned 106 medical interns and senior medical students at two sites to either a standard shift (extended duty overnight shifts of up to 30 hours) or a protected sleep shift (protected five-hour sleep time from 12:30 AM to 5:30 AM). The Institute of Medicine had recommended a protected sleep period of five hours during any shift longer than 16 hours when residents are in the hospital for prolonged duty up to 30 hours.

The researchers found that mean sleep time improved significantly for the protected sleep group at both sites (2.86 versus 1.98 hours and 3.04 versus 2.04 hours). This group was also significantly less likely to have call nights with no sleep (5.8 versus 18.6 percent and 5.9 versus 14.2 percent). The interns in the protected sleep groups also reported feeling significantly less sleepy after on-call nights.

"This study indicates that protected sleep periods during prolonged duty are feasible, likely to increase the amount of uninterrupted sleep interns obtain during extended duty overnight shifts, reduce the number of 24-hour periods awake, and improve behavioral alertness in the morning following on-call nights," Volpp and colleagues conclude.

One author is an employee of Pulsar Informatics.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Periodontal Disease, Erectile Dysfunction Linked Next: Few Internal Medicine Residents Choosing Primary Care

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.