Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Endocrinology | Family Medicine | Gynecology | Nursing | Pathology | Pharmacy | Rheumatology | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Teen Vitamin D Intake Not Related to Adult RA or SLE Risk

Last Updated: December 27, 2012.

 

No link between dietary vitamin D intake during adolescence, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus risk

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Dietary vitamin D intake during adolescence does not appear to be associated with the risk of adult-onset rheumatoid arthritis or systemic lupus erythematosus, according to research published in the December issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

THURSDAY, Dec. 27 (HealthDay News) -- Dietary vitamin D intake during adolescence does not appear to be associated with the risk of adult-onset rheumatoid arthritis (RA) or systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), according to research published in the December issue of Arthritis Care & Research.

In an effort to evaluate the relationship between reported vitamin D intake during adolescence and adult-onset RA and SLE, Linda T. Hiraki, M.D., of the Harvard School of Public Health in Boston, and colleagues used data from food frequency questionnaires concerning high school diet completed by 73,629 participants from the Nurses' Health Study (NHS) and 45,544 participants from NHS II.

The researchers confirmed incident RA in 652 NHS participants and 148 NHSII participants, and SLE in 122 and 54 participants, respectively. There was no significant association observed for adolescent vitamin D intake and the risk of adult-onset RA or SLE, in age- and calorie-adjusted models or multivariate models.

"Although we observed that the majority of nurses reported insufficient vitamin D intakes in their high school years, we did not find associations between reported dietary intake of vitamin D during adolescence and risk of RA or SLE in adulthood," Hiraki and colleagues conclude. "In contrast to prior studies of adult RA and SLE, in the current study, we adjusted for epidemiologic factors that influence circulating vitamin D levels, such as indices of sun exposure."

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2012 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: FDA Approves Juxtapid for Rare Cholesterol Disorder Next: EP Studies Helpful in Lumbar Spinal Stenosis Prognosis

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.