Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Family Medicine | Geriatrics | Internal Medicine | Emergency Medicine | Nursing | Pulmonology | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Prevalence of Drowsy Driving About 4 Percent in U.S.

Last Updated: January 03, 2013.

 

Drowsy driving tied to other sleep-related characteristics, including short sleep duration, snoring

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
The prevalence of drowsy driving is about 4 percent across 19 states and the District of Columbia, and correlates with other sleep-related characteristics, according to a study published in the Jan. 4 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report.

THURSDAY, Jan. 3 (HealthDay News) -- The prevalence of drowsy driving is about 4 percent across 19 states and the District of Columbia, and correlates with other sleep-related characteristics, according to a study published in the Jan. 4 issue of the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's Morbidity & Mortality Weekly Report.

Anne G. Wheaton, Ph.D., from the CDC in Atlanta, and colleagues used data from the Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System during 2009 to 2010 to assess the state-level self-reported prevalence of falling asleep while driving.

The authors report that, across 19 states and the District of Columbia, 4.2 percent of the 147,076 respondents reported having fallen asleep while driving at least once in the previous 30 days. Falling asleep while driving was more likely among men than women (5.3 versus 3.2 percent), and was less likely among non-Hispanic whites than other racial/ethnic groups. Falling asleep while driving was seen more frequently in adults who reported six hours or less of sleep per day, snoring, or falling asleep unintentionally during the day, compared to adults without these characteristics.

"Although it is clear that falling asleep while driving is dangerous, drowsiness impairs driving skills even if drivers manage to stay awake," write the authors of an editorial note. "Drowsy driving crashes are more likely to result in injuries and fatalities than non-drowsy driving crashes."

Full Text

Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Social Withdrawal, Isolation Should Be Addressed in Young Next: Eliquis Approved for People With Non-Valvular Atrial Fibrillation

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.