Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Cardiology | Family Medicine | Geriatrics | Internal Medicine | Nursing | Pharmacy | Anesthesiology & Pain | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Ramipril Improves Walking in Peripheral Artery Disease

Last Updated: February 06, 2013.

 

Duration of pain-free and maximum walking increased; linked to improved physical function

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
For elderly patients with peripheral artery disease and intermittent leg pain during walking, ramipril treatment for six months improves pain-free walking times and improves quality of life, according to a study published in the Feb. 6 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

WEDNESDAY, Feb. 6 (HealthDay News) -- For elderly patients with peripheral artery disease and intermittent leg pain during walking, ramipril treatment for six months improves pain-free walking times and improves quality of life, according to a study published in the Feb. 6 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Anna A. Ahimastos, Ph.D., from the Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute in Melbourne, Australia, and colleagues randomly assigned 212 patients (mean age, 65.5 years) with peripheral artery disease and intermittent claudication to receive placebo or 10 mg/day of the angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitor ramipril for 24 weeks in a 1:1 ratio.

At six months, the researchers found that the ramipril group had a mean 75-second increase in pain-free walking time (P < 0.001) and a mean 255-second increase in maximum walking time (P < 0.001). Walking ability, as assessed by the Walking Impairment Questionnaire, was significantly improved in the ramipril group in the median distance score, speed score, and stair climbing score. Quality of life, as assessed by the Short-Form 36 Health Survey (SF-36), improved for the ramipril group in terms of the median Physical Component Summary score but not the median Mental Component Summary score.

"Among patients with intermittent claudication, 24-week treatment with ramipril resulted in significant increases in pain-free and maximum treadmill walking times compared with placebo," Ahimastos and colleagues conclude. "This was associated with a significant increase in the physical functioning component of the SF-36 score."

Two authors disclosed financial ties to pharmaceutical companies, including Sanofi-Aventis, a marketer of ramipril.

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Health News Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Corticorelin Acetate Has Steroid-Sparing Effect in Brain Cancer Next: Men's Risk of Kidney Stones Up With Ascorbic Acid Supplements

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.