Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Family Medicine | Gastroenterology | Nursing | Pathology | Pediatrics | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Delivery Mode, Infant Diet Affect Gut Microbiota

Last Updated: February 11, 2013.

 

Wide variance seen in profiles of fecal microbiota in healthy 4 month old infants

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Mode of delivery and infant diet affect the gut microbiota early in life, according to a study published online Feb. 11 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

MONDAY, Feb. 11 (HealthDay News) -- Mode of delivery and infant diet affect the gut microbiota early in life, according to a study published online Feb. 11 in CMAJ, the journal of the Canadian Medical Association.

Meghan B. Azad, Ph.D., from the University of Alberta in Edmonton, Canada, and colleagues characterized the gut microbiota of 24 healthy infants participating in the Canadian Healthy Infant Longitudinal Development birth cohort. High-throughput DNA sequencing was used to characterize the microbiota composition from fecal samples collected at 4 months of age.

The researchers identified high variability in the fecal microbiota profiles among the infants. Actinobacteria (mainly the genus Bifidobacterium) and Firmicutes (with diverse representation from numerous genera) generally dominated the profiles. Formula-fed infants had increased richness of species, with overrepresentation of Clostridium difficile, compared to breastfed infants. Infants born by cesarean delivery had lower levels of Escherichia-Shigella and Bacteroides species, with infants born by elective cesarean delivery having particularly low bacterial richness and diversity.

"The findings of this study advance our understanding of the gut microbiota of healthy infants and illustrate how this essential microbial community can be influenced by parent and physician decisions regarding mode of delivery and infant diet," the authors write.

One author and their institution disclosed financial ties to the pharmaceutical industry.

Abstract
Full Text
Editorial (subscription or payment may be required)

Health News Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Progressive Exercise Training May Benefit Diabetic Neuropathy Next: Report Emphasizes Physicians' Role in Gun Policy Discussions

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.