Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Dermatology | Family Medicine | Nursing | Pediatrics | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Review: Growing Body of Evidence Linking Diet to Acne

Last Updated: February 28, 2013.

 

Most convincing evidence for high glycemic load diets; frequent milk, dairy intake also tied to acne

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Evidence suggests that there may be a connection between acne and diet, particularly foods with a high glycemic index, according to a review published in the March issue of the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

THURSDAY, Feb. 28 (HealthDay News) -- Evidence suggests that there may be a connection between acne and diet, particularly foods with a high glycemic index, according to a review published in the March issue of the Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics.

Noting that during the late 1800s and early 1900s diet was often used as an adjunct therapy for acne, Jennifer Burns, R.D., of New York University in New York City, and colleagues reviewed the literature from 1960 to 2012 to assess the correlation between nutrition and acne.

Based on a review of 27 studies, the researchers found that there was a growing body of epidemiological and experimental evidence indicating a correlation between diet and acne. Compared with other dietary factors, there was more convincing evidence found for high glycemic load diets. No randomized trials have been conducted examining the correlation between frequent milk or dairy intake and acne. In addition, few studies have examined the correlation between dietary fat and/or omega-3 fatty acids, and evidence for a link is less robust.

"Taken together, epidemiologic, observational, and experimental evidence suggests an association between diet and acne. This evidence, to date, does not demonstrate that diet causes acne, but may aggravate or influence it to some degree," the authors write. "The medical community should not dismiss the possibility of diet therapy as an adjunct treatment for acne. At this time, the best approach is to address each acne patient individually, carefully considering the possibility of dietary counseling."

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Health News Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Predictors of Mortality, CVD Risk in Cushing's Disease ID'd Next: Caffeine Linked to Low Birth Weight and SGA Babies

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.