Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Family Medicine | Neurology | Pediatrics | Psychiatry | Emergency Medicine | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Data Examined for Traumatic Brain Injuries in Adolescents

Last Updated: June 25, 2013.

 

Sports injuries a common cause of recent traumatic brain injury, particularly in boys

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
In a school survey of students in grades 7 to 12, 20 percent of students reported a traumatic brain injury at some time in their life, and 5.6 percent had an injury within the past 12 months, according to a research letter published in the June 26 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

TUESDAY, June 25 (HealthDay News) -- In a school survey of students in grades 7 to 12, 20 percent of students reported a traumatic brain injury (TBI) at some time in their life, and 5.6 percent had an injury within the past 12 months, according to a research letter published in the June 26 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Gabriela Ilie, Ph.D., of the Injury Prevention Research Office at St. Michael's Hospital in Toronto, and colleagues derived data from a large representative sample of students, aged 11 to 20 years, in grades 7 to 12, to determine the prevalence of TBI, mechanisms of injury, and correlates associated with TBI.

The researchers found that the mean age of the participants was approximately 15 years. The estimated prevalence of TBI in their lifetime (excluding the past 12 months) was about 20 percent. Among the participants, 5.6 percent reported at least one TBI in the preceding 12 months. For TBIs in the past 12 months, more than half (56 percent) were caused by sports injuries, which were more common in boys (63.3 percent) than in girls (46.9 percent). Students with poor school grades were significantly more likely to experience a lifetime TBI (odds ratio, 3.93) compared with those with high grades. Students who reported occasional to frequent use of alcohol and cannabis were at increased risk for TBI in the past 12 months than those who reported no substance abuse.

"Twenty percent of Ontario students in grades 7 to 12 in this province-wide school survey reported a TBI at some point in their life, and 5.6 percent sustained a TBI in the last 12 months," the authors write.

Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Health News Copyright © 2013 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Anti-Gluten Antibodies Linked to Autism Next: High-Tech Therapies Up in Men With Low-Risk Prostate Cancer

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.