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Residual Sleep Apnea Common After Adenotonsillectomy

Last Updated: September 13, 2013.

 

21 percent of children under 3 with obstructive sleep apnea have residual disease after T&A

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For children younger than 3 years with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), residual OSA is relatively common after adenotonsillectomy, according to a study published online Sept. 12 in JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery.

FRIDAY, Sept. 13 (HealthDay News) -- For children younger than 3 years with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA), residual OSA is relatively common after adenotonsillectomy (T&A), according to a study published online Sept. 12 in JAMA Otolaryngology-Head & Neck Surgery.

Andrea Nath, M.D., from the University of Chicago Medicine, and colleagues examined the impact of T&A on sleep parameters using data from a retrospective review of medical records for 283 children younger than 3 years with polysomnogram (PSG)-documented OSA who underwent T&A. Pre- and postoperative PSGs were available for 70 of these patients.

In the patients with pre- and postoperative PSGs, the researchers found that after T&A, there were significant improvements in the mean apnea hypopnea index (34.8 to 5.7); baseline oxygen saturation (96.6 to 97.2 percent); minimum oxygen saturation (77.2 to 89.9 percent); and sleep efficiency (84.7 to 88.7 percent). Twenty-one percent of the patients had residual OSA when OSA was defined as apnea hypopnea index greater than 5. The severity of preoperative OSA was the most consistent predictor of residual OSA after T&A (P = 0.02).

"In a subgroup of children younger than 3 years with OSA, we found a high rate of residual OSA after T&A," the authors write. "Predictors of residual disease include severity of preoperative OSA as determined by PSG result. Postoperative PSGs might be indicated in these patients."

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