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Child Milestone Delay With Parent Violence, Stress Exposure

Last Updated: November 04, 2013.

 

Delays noted with exposure to intimate partner violence and/or parental psychological distress

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Exposure to parent-reported intimate partner violence or parental psychological distress is associated with delayed attainment of developmental milestones during the first 72 months of life, according to a study published online Nov. 4 in Pediatrics.

MONDAY, Nov. 4 (HealthDay News) -- Exposure to parent-reported intimate partner violence (IPV) or parental psychological distress (PPD) is associated with delayed attainment of developmental milestones during the first 72 months of life, according to a study published online Nov. 4 in Pediatrics.

Amy Lewis Gilbert, J.D., M.P.H., from the Indiana University School of Medicine in Indianapolis, and colleagues conducted a cross-sectional analysis in a large cohort of 16,595 children younger than 72 months to examine the relationship between parental report of IPV and/or PPD and the attainment of developmental milestones within the first 72 months of a child's life.

The researchers found that the likelihood of failing at least one milestone across language, personal-social, and gross motor domains was significantly increased for children of parents reporting both IPV and PPD (88 subjects) (adjusted odds ratios [aORs], 2.1, 1.9, and 3.0, respectively). For those reporting IPV-only (331 subjects), there were significant associations for language, personal-social, and fine motor-adaptive domains (aORs, 1.4, 1.7, and 1.7, respectively), while for those reporting PPD-only (1,920 subjects), there were significant associations for language, personal-social, gross motor, and fine-motor adaptive domains (aORs, 1.5, 1.6, 1.6, and 1.6, respectively).

"Screening children for IPV and PPD helps identify those at risk for poor developmental outcomes who may benefit from early intervention," the authors conclude.

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