Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Blogs  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 

 Headlines:

 

Category: Family Medicine | Hematology | Infections | AIDS | Internal Medicine | Critical Care | Emergency Medicine | Nursing | Oncology | Pathology | Pediatrics | Surgery | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

New System Aims to Improve Blood Transfusion Safety

Last Updated: February 19, 2010.

 

Using national data, CDC will monitor adverse events related to transfusions

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has started a national surveillance system to monitor adverse events in patients who receive blood transfusions, the agency has announced.

FRIDAY, Feb. 19 (HealthDay News) -- The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has started a national surveillance system to monitor adverse events in patients who receive blood transfusions, the agency has announced.

The new system is called the Hemovigilance Module, and it is part of the CDC's Internet-based National Healthcare Safety Network. With the coordinated national network, the CDC will be able to summarize national data to help determine how to prevent medical errors, adverse transfusion events such as reactions to blood products, and process problems.

The CDC is encouraging health care facilities across the nation to enroll in the new system to improve patient safety. Through the Hemovigilance Module, hospitals will submit data to the CDC confidentially, enabling the agency to review all national data. Previously, transfusion-related events were monitored by hospitals themselves.

"This is an important advance in monitoring the safety of transfusions for patients nationwide. This system will enable health care facilities to better recognize blood transfusion-related adverse events so that they can improve the care of patients who have transfusions," Matthew J. Kuehnert, M.D., director of the CDC's Office of Blood, Organ, and Other Tissue Safety in Atlanta, said in a Feb. 18 press release.

Press Release

Copyright © 2010 HealthDay. All rights reserved.


Previous: Minimally Invasive Techniques Beneficial for Uterine Fibroids Next: Flat Head Syndrome Linked to Delayed Neurodevelopment

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

  • Ask a Doctor Teams: Respond to patient questions and discuss challenging presentations with other members.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.