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ACC: Rosuvastatin Helps Prevent Venous Thromboembolism

Last Updated: March 30, 2009.

 

Large-scale study shows that statin treatment independently reduces the risk by 43 percent

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Rosuvastatin significantly reduces the risk of symptomatic venous thromboembolism, according to a study published online March 29 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with the American College of Cardiology's 58th Annual Scientific Session in Orlando, Fla. Another study published online March 29 in The Lancet found that reduction of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol is a key component of rosuvastatin's efficacy.

MONDAY, March 30 (HealthDay News) -- Rosuvastatin significantly reduces the risk of symptomatic venous thromboembolism, according to a study published online March 29 in the New England Journal of Medicine to coincide with the American College of Cardiology's 58th Annual Scientific Session in Orlando, Fla. Another study published online March 29 in The Lancet found that reduction of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol is a key component of rosuvastatin's efficacy.

In the first study, Robert J. Glynn, of Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, and colleagues randomly assigned 17,802 subjects with LDL cholesterol levels of less than 130 mg/dL and hsCRP levels of 2.0 mg/L or higher to receive 20 mg per day of rosuvastatin or placebo. After a median follow-up of 1.9 years, they found that only 34 of the rosuvastatin group developed symptomatic venous thromboembolism compared to 60 of the placebo group (hazard ratio 0.57). Rosuvastatin was associated with lower rates of unprovoked and provoked venous thromboembolism, pulmonary embolism and deep-vein thrombosis only, the researchers report.

In the second study, Paul M. Ridker, M.D., of Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston, and colleagues followed-up 15,548 initially healthy patients from the JUPITER trial. They found that compared with placebo, patients on rosuvastatin who achieved LDL cholesterol less than 1.8 mmol/L had a 55 percent reduction in vascular events. Those who achieved hsCRP less than 2 mg/L had a 62 percent reduction. Patients who achieved both LDL less than 1.8 mmol/L and hsCRP less than 2 mg/L had a 65 percent reduction in vascular events, whereas those who achieved only one or neither target had a 33 percent reduction, the authors write.

"This [symptomatic venous thromboembolism] risk reduction appears to be an independent benefit of statin use, beyond the reduction in the risk of arterial thrombosis," Glynn and colleagues conclude. "Widening the goal of treatment to include the prevention of venous thromboembolism and death, in addition to arterial thrombosis, increases the estimated benefit of statin use."

The first study was supported by AstraZeneca; several authors of both studies have disclosed financial relationships with AstraZeneca and other pharmaceutical companies.

Abstract - Glynn
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Abstract - Ridker
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