Create Account | Sign In: Author or Forum

 
News  |  Journals  |  Conferences  |  Opinion  |  Articles  |  Forums  |  Twitter    
 
Category: Family Medicine | Internal Medicine | Psychiatry | Journal

Back to Journal Articles

Housing for Homeless Alcoholics May Reduce Public Burden

Last Updated: March 31, 2009.

 

Housing active alcoholics leads to reductions in alcohol consumption and need for crisis care

Share |

Comments: (0)

Tell-a-Friend

 

  Related
 
Health care use and costs for chronically homeless people with severe alcohol problems are substantially reduced when they are provided housing without the precondition of abstinence from alcohol, according to a study published in the April 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

TUESDAY, March 31 (HealthDay News) -- Health care use and costs for chronically homeless people with severe alcohol problems are substantially reduced when they are provided housing without the precondition of abstinence from alcohol, according to a study published in the April 1 issue of the Journal of the American Medical Association.

Mary E. Larimer, Ph.D., of the University of Washington in Seattle, and colleagues conducted a study of 95 previously homeless people with severe alcohol problems who were housed under the Housing First program, and compared their service use and costs with 39 wait-listed controls.

Median costs for the housed subjects dropped from $4,066 per person per month in the year prior to being housed, to $1,492 and $958 after six and 12 months in housing, respectively, the researchers report. Relative to wait-listed controls, the housed subjects had 53 percent lower costs over the first six months, the investigators found.

"These findings support the basic premise of Housing First: providing housing to individuals who remain actively addicted to alcohol, without conditions such as abstinence or treatment attendance, can reduce the public burden associated with overuse of crisis services and reduce alcohol consumption," the authors write. "Findings support strategies to retain these individuals in housing, including offering on-site medical and mental health services, supportive case managers, and minimal rules and regulations pertaining to their housing."

Abstract
Full Text (subscription or payment may be required)

Copyright © 2009 ScoutNews, LLC. All rights reserved.


Previous: Neck Disc Offers Good Results After Earlier Fusion Next: Little Clinical Evidence to Support Bed Bug Treatments

Reader comments on this article are listed below. Review our comments policy.


Submit your opinion:

Name:

Email:

Location:

URL:

Remember my personal information

Notify me of follow-up comments?

advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)
 

Are you a Doctor, Pharmacist, PA or a Nurse?

Join the Doctors Lounge online medical community

  • Editorial activities: Publish, peer review, edit online articles.

Doctors Lounge Membership Application

 
     

 advertisement.gif (61x7 -- 0 bytes)

 

 

Useful Sites
MediLexicon
  Tools & Services: Follow DoctorsLounge on Twitter Follow us on Twitter | RSS News | Newsletter | Contact us
Copyright © 2001-2014
Doctors Lounge.
All rights reserved.

Medical Reference:
Diseases | Symptoms
Drugs | Labs | Procedures
Software | Tutorials

Advertising
Links | Humor
Forum Archive
CME | Conferences

Privacy Statement
Terms & Conditions
Editorial Board
About us | Email

This website is certified by Health On the Net Foundation. Click to verify. This site complies with the HONcode standard for trustworthy health information:
verify here.